CC50 Planning

#22
Thanks Scott. So how do these programs work regarding certification of this ride? I see you can record trips for others to view, right? So then is there a way to submit some saved file to IBA that will verify our route/time/mileage? Because I can see how that would be advantageous.
After you create a free Spotwalla account; you can link to either a dedicated GPS tracking device (Spot, InReach etc.) or app based through your phone (Bubbler, SW Connect). Obviously the dedicatd GPS units are more reliable and required for the Iron Butt Rally; but app based is generally good enough for most rides in North America and allows you to experiment at a lower dollar cost; plus it is acceptable for many other sponsored rallies. You provide the Certification Team the url for your Spotwalla trip and it can be used as a secondary verification source (primary is still DBRs). You would also provide your planned route (map, google map, map quest) etc. I use app-based tracking for the additional verification of completed rides and to enable family/friends to check progress.
 

Ira

Staff member
Premier Member
IBR Finisher
IBR Staff
#23
Thanks Scott. So how do these programs work regarding certification of this ride? I see you can record trips for others to view, right? So then is there a way to submit some saved file to IBA that will verify our route/time/mileage? Because I can see how that would be advantageous.
Satellite and GPS track logs are very good additional documentation, but they do not replace the required documentation. So they are advantageous in terms of bolstering your ride claim, but not in terms of reducing time spent off the bike.

Ira Agins
Iron Butt Association
 

Brian Thorn

Premier Member
#24
If you go with something like Bubbler for your first toe in the water, you should have a good experience since you're on I-10 pretty much the whole way.

Where products like SPOT and inReach come into play is when you get into remote areas without any cell phone coverage. Bubbler will store up its waypoints and send them when it once again has coverage, but the SPOT and inReach are satellite based and rarely lose a signal unless you're in heavy forest or deep canyons.

Another upside of the sat items is that you can use them to call for help via a ping to the satellite if you don't have cell phone coverage. The inReach and the (brand new) SPOTX also allow texting via satellite so you can communicate with the rescue team.

I'm a belts and suspenders guy so I carry an inReach in a powered cradle on the bike, and I have an ACR Personal Locator Beacon on my person in case I have an incident and get separated from my bike. Unless my arms are broken I'll still be able to call for help.
 
#25
After you create a free Spotwalla account; you can link to either a dedicated GPS tracking device (Spot, InReach etc.) or app based through your phone (Bubbler, SW Connect). Obviously the dedicatd GPS units are more reliable and required for the Iron Butt Rally; but app based is generally good enough for most rides in North America and allows you to experiment at a lower dollar cost; plus it is acceptable for many other sponsored rallies. You provide the Certification Team the url for your Spotwalla trip and it can be used as a secondary verification source (primary is still DBRs). You would also provide your planned route (map, google map, map quest) etc. I use app-based tracking for the additional verification of completed rides and to enable family/friends to check progress.
If you go with something like Bubbler for your first toe in the water, you should have a good experience since you're on I-10 pretty much the whole way.

Where products like SPOT and inReach come into play is when you get into remote areas without any cell phone coverage. Bubbler will store up its waypoints and send them when it once again has coverage, but the SPOT and inReach are satellite based and rarely lose a signal unless you're in heavy forest or deep canyons.

Another upside of the sat items is that you can use them to call for help via a ping to the satellite if you don't have cell phone coverage. The inReach and the (brand new) SPOTX also allow texting via satellite so you can communicate with the rescue team.

I'm a belts and suspenders guy so I carry an inReach in a powered cradle on the bike, and I have an ACR Personal Locator Beacon on my person in case I have an incident and get separated from my bike. Unless my arms are broken I'll still be able to call for help.
Thanks so much for the information, Brian. Very detailed, easy to understand for a less-technically inclined guy like me, and very valuable. It’s hard to believe the belts-n-suspenders part, though. But it definitely sounds like you’ve embraced technology and all it’s benefits. I’ll have to let you know how it works out.

Sincerely,
Ron Gettler
 

rneal55555

Well-Known Member
#26
Before you commit to using using the extra gas as you've described you should run the numbers. Have the guy go out with the can and time some stops it wont be an exact science but see how long he spends in a rest area from hitting the off ramp to back in the travel lane. do it a few time to get an average multiply that time by the number of stops those with the larger tanks will have to make, that along with the small amount of extra time needed to break out fill and stow the fuel can will approximate the amount of extra time needed to use the gallon can as aux fuel. Then compute the number of fuel stops needed for short range bike vs the others without the aux fuel and compare the amount of time needed to do the extra stops. I bet it's so close to a wash as to not be worth it.
 
#27
Before you commit to using using the extra gas as you've described you should run the numbers. Have the guy go out with the can and time some stops it wont be an exact science but see how long he spends in a rest area from hitting the off ramp to back in the travel lane. do it a few time to get an average multiply that time by the number of stops those with the larger tanks will have to make, that along with the small amount of extra time needed to break out fill and stow the fuel can will approximate the amount of extra time needed to use the gallon can as aux fuel. Then compute the number of fuel stops needed for short range bike vs the others without the aux fuel and compare the amount of time needed to do the extra stops. I bet it's so close to a wash as to not be worth it.
Ugh, Neal. That sounds too much like “work,” and I avoid that crap like the plague. I think we’ll just try to back it on down a bit (travel with the flow of traffic), which I know from making plenty of runs from Tampa to Houston/Austin/Dallas, is pretty dang fast as it is. Then we’ll just stop when WHOever get low on fuel. Our last SS1000 as a group, one girl had a Softail Slim with a 3 gal tank. We had to stop like every 120 miles! Grrr. But this run everybody has 5 1/2 gal tanks. We’ll still carry at least 1 tank in case we push the envelope. I hope that’s not the case.

In that regard, it brings up a good question. It’s been a while since I’ve run those roads (West TX, AZ, NM) and I recall it gets pretty desolate out there. Anybody know what the fuel situation is out there? Readily available? Or should we grab fuel when we get close?

Thanks for the recommendation, though. I appreciate the concern and the effort.

Anxious to roll!

Ron Gettler
 

kwthom

Rider
Premier Member
IBA Member
#28
<...>In that regard, it brings up a good question. It’s been a while since I’ve run those roads (West TX, AZ, NM) and I recall it gets pretty desolate out there. Anybody know what the fuel situation is out there? Readily available? Or should we grab fuel when we get close?
Look here:

https://roadnow.com/i10/gas-stations-texas-3

https://roadnow.com/i10/gas-stations-arizona-1

https://roadnow.com/i8/gas-stations Check both AZ & CA at that link.

As I recall, about 150 miles is the largest distance between fuel stops in TX, and there's a couple of them.
 

Scott Parish

Premier Member
#29
+1 what Ken said. Plenty of fuel opportunities. I normally just plan through Google; pick a comfortable distance I want to travel between stops and look for a primary and secondary fuel location and add to my route. This way I always have a good idea of how long to the next stop. Pretty standard - I'm sure you do the same.
 
#30
+1 what Ken said. Plenty of fuel opportunities. I normally just plan through Google; pick a comfortable distance I want to travel between stops and look for a primary and secondary fuel location and add to my route. This way I always have a good idea of how long to the next stop. Pretty standard - I'm sure you do the same.

Thanks Scott, and yes, I like to have stops pre-planned. So between Google Maps, Google searches for stations whose hours will match our itineraries, and the links that kwthom kindly shared, I think we’ll be okay.

Now I just need to figure out the logistics of our start time. We’ll need to get a hotel in J-ville before our start. We don’t want to ride 3-hours THEN start a 22-hour ride. But most hotel check-in times are 3:00pm. But it’s hard to sleep at 3:00pm to get rested up for such a long ride. Besides, we don’t want to leave at something like at 8:00am then hit our BBG mark in Van Horn, TX at what... 5:00am local time? (Please indulge my thinking out loud, so to speak). So I’m thinking a good departure time would be something more like 10:00pm, so we hit BBG miles at 7:00pm local time figuring 22 hrs to make the 1,514 mile ride. Then spend 12 hours to check in, grab a bite to eat, shower, (polish the bike... a “Harley” thang! Lol), and hit the hay then pack in the morning and grab a big breakfast before getting on the road. Get on the road around 6:00am for the remaining 12-hour ride to Ocean Beach, putting us there around 4:00pm local time? So 22 + 12 + 12 = 46 hours, leaving us leeway for the end run should any problems arise. What do ya think? I guess we’ll just have to see if we can arrange an early check-in at a hotel on Jacksonville Beach to see if we can get some rest before we head out?

Alright, my brain hurts now. Thanks for the help guys. Really! I trust in your experience.

Semper Fi,

Top G
 

kwthom

Rider
Premier Member
IBA Member
#31
A little more data to consume...

I did my ride alone. My 22.2 hour BBG ride from the beach to Van Horn, TX means my *average* speed was right close to 69 MPH. This means my 'real' average speed was....well, you can estimate it yourself. That's haulin' the mail, if you follow...

I had one 15 minute stop - all of my other stops were at ten minutes or less. ZERO mucking about - get gas, get moving. Need to relieve yourself, stop, do the job & get moving again.

Here's the 8 minute long video...note that I keep the clock in the same timezone thru the entire ride. If you watch this on a desktop, there's additional annotations in the video that can't be seen on mobile (YouTube weirdness)

 
#32
A little more data to consume...

I did my ride alone. My 22.2 hour BBG ride from the beach to Van Horn, TX means my *average* speed was right close to 69 MPH. This means my 'real' average speed was....well, you can estimate it yourself. That's haulin' the mail, if you follow...

I had one 15 minute stop - all of my other stops were at ten minutes or less. ZERO mucking about - get gas, get moving. Need to relieve yourself, stop, do the job & get moving again.

Here's the 8 minute long video...note that I keep the clock in the same timezone thru the entire ride. If you watch this on a desktop, there's additional annotations in the video that can't be seen on mobile (YouTube weirdness)

Awesome info, kwthom. Thanks. That’s what I was wondering. Do you recall about how many miles you got between stops? My most recent SS1000 I did 1,117 in 17hr 55min. That was avg 62 mph. Take out the 1 hr (+) delay on the PA Turnpike and that bumps the avg to 66 mph. So your 69 mph was impressive. I too only stopped for fuel and to occasionally relieve myself. Helmet rarely came off, and only a slight delay to don then remove rain gear between Cincinnati and Lexington, KY.

SO... back to the theory of slower, with higher MPG versus Faster pace with more miles covered. (Yeh I know... when you’re trying to beat the clock it’s hard to stay out of the throttle. Nothing wild, but creeping by everyone else.)
 

kwthom

Rider
Premier Member
IBA Member
#33
Of course - part of my data submitted to IBA!

50cc_distance.JPG

Six legs at 175 miles or greater, four at 190 or greater. My 'low fuel' light starts flickering between 190 and 210, so I probably only had 30 to 40 miles before I turned into a pedestrian. Worried? Nope, I'd run that bike dry more than once; I knew I had a bit of reserve. Fuel consumed at each leg was as I'd expected.

First half of first day, I got off plan with an unplanned stop. Thus, I had to 'plan and ride' at the same time in order to get back onto my original plan. East of Houston, you can get away with that, but west of there, you're limited as you saw on those links I provided earlier.

EDIT: There's no problem running a SS1000 pace to do this ride - 2380/40 hours (giving 10 hours of rest/fuel stops) is about 60 MPH or a moving speed of 70, which is what *most* of that corridor has for posted speed limit.

EDIT: Day 1 longest stop : 16 minutes. Average stop time: 9 minutes. Day 2, I was a LOT slower, since my wife was with me - I had one 20 minute stop and one 30 minute stop with her. Still made it with hours to spare.
 
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Brian Thorn

Premier Member
#34
So your 69 mph was impressive.
Keep in mind that the legal limit in west Texas is 80 and 85 is usually safe, while AZ and NM 75 limits are usually good for 80. When you are in the "Safety Corridors" in NM and the new ones in AZ I do recommend riding the limit or make sure you have a good rabbit to follow if you are going to exceed the limit, and even then you have to keep watching your mirrors to look for Smokey coming up behind you. On most of my rides westbound at night approaching Deming NM there has been a car running radar sitting on the side of the road blacked out. If you have a radar detector you'll have plenty of warning.
 

Scott Parish

Premier Member
#35
So I’m thinking a good departure time would be something more like 10:00pm, so we hit BBG miles at 7:00pm local time figuring 22 hrs to make the 1,514 mile ride.
I often work backwards as well when figuring out a start time based on when I want to arrive. Did the same for my 100CCC knowing I wanted to arrive in Jax by 6pm to maximize rest time on the first 50 hours while stopped which meant a 0200 start in San Diego. Since I live about 25-30 miles from Ocean Beach; I had to allow for 30 minute ride time to the beach; grab a picture at the boardwalk before pulling official receipt which meant I was planning to get up around 12:30AM and on the road by 0115. As we have all experienced; the anticipation of a ride we have not done previously usually means we get little rest. Add to the equation of a start time way outside normal routine equals zero sleep which happened in my case. I left work early that day to get home hoping to lay down around 6pm to bank a few hours of sleep. Of course - the only thing that happened was me laying there thinking about the ride and getting more tired the longer I stayed in bed. I ended up just getting up at 10pm to review plan, check gear and left the house about 30 minutes ahead of schedule. Now I try to plan my rides more around my normal clock (I'm up M-F at 0330-0400) which allows me to follow a regular routine. Your 10PM planned start time makes sense logistically; but you will have to consider it likely all of you will be starting at a time your body is used to resting. Adrenaline will keep you going the first 4-5 hours; but expect around 0300-0500 to hit a wall once the adrenaline has cleared. I worked night shift in the hospital for 20 years and the hours of 0300-0500 were always hardest and that was with me being used to being up all night. Sunrise will help; but you might want to think carefully about the start time and weigh it against each rider's regular wake/sleep cycle. If you guys are able to routinely nap during the day (something I can never do) you might be okay with getting a few hours sleep prior to 10PM. I admire the challenge as you are attempting two rides (BBG/50CC) together that you have not previously completed. The good thing about a BBG is the BBS or BB is always available as a back-up if you need to take longer break/power nap.
 

Brian Thorn

Premier Member
#36
Your 10PM planned start time makes sense logistically; but you will have to consider it likely all of you will be starting at a time your body is used to resting. Adrenaline will keep you going the first 4-5 hours; but expect around 0300-0500 to hit a wall once the adrenaline has cleared.
That is so, so true. On April 1 I started a New Mexico Tour Of Honor Extreme SaddleSore at midnight, and by 5 am I was dead tired. Fortunately for me I came across a great rest area on I-25 north at San Acacia. Found a covered bench and fell right asleep. 30 minutes later I woke up, hit the road and did the next 15+ hours with no issues.

Since I'll be starting my SD to JAX run at midnight I have the same concerns, so when the sun starts to pop above the horizon I might stop for a quick nap. I'd like to do a BBG on the first portion, but if I get tired I'm grabbing some rest.
 

Garage Monster

Premier Member
IBA Member
#37
I completed my CC50 just in April and I am just now finding time to put it all together. I am a premiere member so no need for witnesses and everything will be done via email. The ride is not that hard it just means riding.
I did Santa Monica , CA to Tybee island, GA just for variety.
2484 GPS miles in 45 hours 31 minutes. That included 6.5 hours for a sleep stop in Oklahoma. I too carried a fuel can that holds a quart and needed it to get to one gas stop that I was stretching. Despite temps if the 30's most of the first night I enjoyed the experience.
For tracking I used a phone app called Bubbler. There is a free version but I used Bubbler Pro as it tracks more often and is cheap. It allows you to share your track with others. The IBA will get a link and that helps to verify my trip.

Have fun.
 

Dr. Tiki

Premier Member
#38
I'm doing my 50cc in Sept. as well at the end of a 3 week bike trip. My plan right now is to leave Jax on Sept. 12 for San Diego. I'm not planning a leave time though. I'll wake up, have my breakfast, pack the bike and leave when I leave.
 

Brian Thorn

Premier Member
#39
I'm doing my 50cc in Sept. as well at the end of a 3 week bike trip. My plan right now is to leave Jax on Sept. 12 for San Diego. I'm not planning a leave time though. I'll wake up, have my breakfast, pack the bike and leave when I leave.
If all goes well I will arrive in JAX from SD early in the morning on the 10th. Some time to recover and see friends and pick up my wife at the airport, and then we're off to TN on the 11th or 12th.