Pee Stops

rneal55555

Well-Known Member
#23
This might be your solution.
-DEL
They have it installed backwards and my wife says she's not getting on it even if it does have a heated seat :)

I just go every time I get fuel. I don't have an aux fuel tank so it comes out about right and the little bit of a walk walk does me good, Generally I fuel, hit the head grab a couple of drinks ( a couple bottle of water when it's super hot of maybe a soda and a water when its not. I drink coffee as well) and something I can eat on the bike. I've done a BBG that way and a few SS1000's maintaining a BBG pace as long as I wanted to.

When I travel with the wife stops are two hours from the end of the last one no matter what's in the tank, that's her limit. We also have at least two sit down meals a day. She's done a SS1000 as a pilon but has no desire to do another one although 800 mile days are not that uncommon when we have somewhere to be.
 
#25
Thanks guys but I wanted information from men who have used a catheter while riding. I meant this to be a serious question. I have ridden enough IBA rides to know how to handle things without one. So far I have not received any first person experiences. Therefore I must assume catheters are not worth the trouble. I really do not need advice on such things as stop to walk around, pee when I need to, or how to manage fluids and time. I have 22 certified rides. I just wanted to know if a catheter was anything worth trying in an effort to decrease my time between and at fuel stops therefore giving me a little more time to complete a BB 1500 Gold. I will consider this question closed. Thanks to all of you.
 

Micah2074

Premier Member
#26
Thanks guys but I wanted information from men who have used a catheter while riding. I meant this to be a serious question. I have ridden enough IBA rides to know how to handle things without one. So far I have not received any first person experiences. Therefore I must assume catheters are not worth the trouble. I really do not need advice on such things as stop to walk around, pee when I need to, or how to manage fluids and time. I have 22 certified rides. I just wanted to know if a catheter was anything worth trying in an effort to decrease my time between and at fuel stops therefore giving me a little more time to complete a BB 1500 Gold. I will consider this question closed. Thanks to all of you.
Give it a try and report back. Somebody’s got to be the first and that somebody might be you.
 

kwthom

Rider
Premier Member
IBA Member
#27
Two certified BBG's - each slightly over 22.1 hours in duration. I'm in my mid-50's.

Stopped for dedicated bio-break twice, two additional times in conjunction with fuel stops on the first BBG. The second BBG, I'd dehydrated myself a bit more; four stops again. This time, three times in conjunction with fuel stops - one independent of a fuel break.

Agree, doesn't seem to be worth the trouble - but, then again, I'm not too sure it would be something that would be discussed in an open forum.

Luck to you!
 

TheRoss

Premier Member
IBR Finisher
#29
I never go into a gas station to pee. I find a quick place to stop on the shoulder, and let the bike provide some cover. I get to leave the bike running, and I don't worry about securing my helmet or anything. The longer I wait to go, the faster I am able to accomplish the task and get moving again.

I don't combine gas and bio breaks... on gas stops I stay on the bike and am only stopped long enough to get the gas in the tank.

I wore an external cath years ago on a BBG1500... but I wouldn't want to be worrying about hygiene down there on a multiday ride. I don't think it provided me much advantage on that ride.
 
#30
a catheter that sounds a bit serious, don't see the need this could be self defeating I take the view a short break off the bike refreshes the body and try to separate my stops to maximise the frequency of breaks. Ok to many breaks will lower your average speed so be sensible,
this is my theory and it seems to work for me getting of the bike for a short period and moving about allows blood etc to flow muscles to work and alleviates cramp meaning over a long period of time (days rather than hours) the body suffers less fatigue hence spend more time in the saddle. so for me more shorter stops are better than fewer longer stops.
You will need to pee and this is more frequent with age as most of us know perhaps its the bodies way of telling you the rest of your body needs a break as well ? just a thought.
 
#31
Some folks have mentioned 'managing' the intake of fluids. I am fairly new to LDR, but I find that I stay more comfortable, stay better hydrated, _and_ need fewer pee stops, if I drink small amounts regularly as I ride. I have a gallon jug with a hose to it, and I sip on that periodically. I'm on medication that is specifically designed to make me pee more often, and I can still go 300 miles at a stretch much of the time. Not every time mind you, but a lot.
 
#32
managing the intake of fluid is more to do with getting enough fluid how much you take in and when is variable I do little and often every time I stop I drink unless the stops are really close together some people have systems so they can drink on the move personal preference as to whether you prefer this.. even on the coldest days I drink : a flask of beef tea in the pannier just warms me up a bit. having it as a set routine at a stop means I don't forget. But as a rule I drink water and nothing else on the bike.

Not sure about the 300 mile bit I would think more a accurate gauge is time between pees - i. e. how many hours roughly, and I'm not actually timing this if I think its a long time since I need too then I'm probably not drinking enough. the true test of this is the colour of said fluid not sure how you gauge this as it escapes a tube strapped to your ankle at 70mph. my rule of thumb is anything darker than light straw colour and time to drink more.
what goes in must come out
 

Jon Kerr

Premier Member
#37
I wear an External catheter depending on which ride or rally I’m doing, external catheters are also called condom catheters and are In my opinion a great way to save time if that’s important to you. If you don’t have an auxiliary fuel cell on your bike, then you’re probably not riding in the group that would need to use external catheters because you’re stopping frequently enough to be wasting time for fuel stops. Adding a catheter to your regimen should be after adding a fuel cell.

I never urinate in a gas station or a restaurant, it simply takes too much time, you have to walk over to the facility, and often times grab a key or wait in line. Besides, I like to mark my territory across the beautiful country roads of America and not in gas stations or McDonald’s.

Doing a saddlesore or a 50CC doesn’t really Necessitate the use of a catheter to save time, however in a rally like ButtLite or the IBR, every minute really does count. I know of many of the top riders who use catheters, and also know plenty who do not. At that level a rider should have optimized multiple variables so that he/she is as efficient as possible. If you haven’t addressed many of those variables, I would start there before adding a catheter to your list. For me, in a “non-catheter” ride, I’ll pee When I need to and I just pull over stretch and do the deed. My morning constitutional, however, is always in a restaurant, hotel or a gas station. For that, I have not yet perfected the art of pooping in the woods.

I’ll place a catheter and typically wear it for 2 to 3 days until I’m at a stage end and staying in a hotel on a multi-day Rally. I’ve tried the catheter with a tube in a bag and that’s a terrible idea. Now I just have the tube that goes out the bottom of my pants connected with rubber bands to the outside of my boots and I stand on my bike and let loose. Miss took some training with mentally and physically to perfect this art.

If done correctly and if the catheters changed every several days then you should not develop a urinary tract infection.

For me on a long ride hydration is key and I will drink and Drink. It’s nice to know that urinating is not an issue which will slow me down. I calculate that I urinate about every 2 to 3 hours. On an 11 day ride if it takes 3.5 minutes to stop and Pee, and I’m peeing every 3 hours, that’s 88 stops. I’m out there riding because I love to ride, when my bladder is full it’s distracting and disturbing and I’m not having fun. And therefore pee when I need to pee. So three hours. Sometimes every five hours. If every five hours, that still 53 stops x 3.5 minutes. That includes slow down time, getting off the bike in an appropriate area, walking in appropriate distance, getting all of your motorcycle gear out of the way and then doing the deed, zipping back up and all your gear on and getting back to the bike and taking off. That’s a lot of time. On the multi-day rally that time adds up and certainly has been beneficial for me.

In the 2017 IBR on day nine I hit a deer in Montana and destroyed my bike and broke my leg. When I realized I was still alive, the first thing I did was reach down into my pants and pull off the condom catheter. I didn’t want to EMS team asking me, “what the hell?”
 
#38
I wear an External catheter depending on which ride or rally I’m doing, external catheters are also called condom catheters and are In my opinion a great way to save time if that’s important to you. If you don’t have an auxiliary fuel cell on your bike, then you’re probably not riding in the group that would need to use external catheters because you’re stopping frequently enough to be wasting time for fuel stops. Adding a catheter to your regimen should be after adding a fuel cell.

I never urinate in a gas station or a restaurant, it simply takes too much time, you have to walk over to the facility, and often times grab a key or wait in line. Besides, I like to mark my territory across the beautiful country roads of America and not in gas stations or McDonald’s.

Doing a saddlesore or a 50CC doesn’t really Necessitate the use of a catheter to save time, however in a rally like ButtLite or the IBR, every minute really does count. I know of many of the top riders who use catheters, and also know plenty who do not. At that level a rider should have optimized multiple variables so that he/she is as efficient as possible. If you haven’t addressed many of those variables, I would start there before adding a catheter to your list. For me, in a “non-catheter” ride, I’ll pee When I need to and I just pull over stretch and do the deed. My morning constitutional, however, is always in a restaurant, hotel or a gas station. For that, I have not yet perfected the art of pooping in the woods.

I’ll place a catheter and typically wear it for 2 to 3 days until I’m at a stage end and staying in a hotel on a multi-day Rally. I’ve tried the catheter with a tube in a bag and that’s a terrible idea. Now I just have the tube that goes out the bottom of my pants connected with rubber bands to the outside of my boots and I stand on my bike and let loose. Miss took some training with mentally and physically to perfect this art.

If done correctly and if the catheters changed every several days then you should not develop a urinary tract infection.

For me on a long ride hydration is key and I will drink and Drink. It’s nice to know that urinating is not an issue which will slow me down. I calculate that I urinate about every 2 to 3 hours. On an 11 day ride if it takes 3.5 minutes to stop and Pee, and I’m peeing every 3 hours, that’s 88 stops. I’m out there riding because I love to ride, when my bladder is full it’s distracting and disturbing and I’m not having fun. And therefore pee when I need to pee. So three hours. Sometimes every five hours. If every five hours, that still 53 stops x 3.5 minutes. That includes slow down time, getting off the bike in an appropriate area, walking in appropriate distance, getting all of your motorcycle gear out of the way and then doing the deed, zipping back up and all your gear on and getting back to the bike and taking off. That’s a lot of time. On the multi-day rally that time adds up and certainly has been beneficial for me.

In the 2017 IBR on day nine I hit a deer in Montana and destroyed my bike and broke my leg. When I realized I was still alive, the first thing I did was reach down into my pants and pull off the condom catheter. I didn’t want to EMS team asking me, “what the hell?”
 
#39
<<I wear an External catheter depending on which ride or rally I’m doing, external catheters are also called condom catheters>>
External catheters can be a problem for some, you know, because of "shrinkage". Now I myself, being a manly man, have never had that particular problem but some of the brethren might...

...And for those of you too young to understand the reference to "shrinkage", see this clip at about 1:30

-DL
 
#40
I’ll place a catheter and typically wear it for 2 to 3 days until I’m at a stage end and staying in a hotel on a multi-day Rally. I’ve tried the catheter with a tube in a bag and that’s a terrible idea. Now I just have the tube that goes out the bottom of my pants connected with rubber bands to the outside of my boots and I stand on my bike and let loose. Miss took some training with mentally and physically to perfect this art.
Note to self - never ride behind Jon Kerr.