What do you carry for spare parts?

keithu

Active Member
#41
I'm surprised nobody has mentioned vice grips. (Or did I miss it?) I once had a piece of road debris break off my shift lever and was able to use vice grips as a replacement. I know a number of other riders have fixed things with vice grips too.
 

Stephen!

Premier Member
IBA Member
#42
Had the nub break off the lever end of the clutch cable on a GL1000. By adjusting both ends I was able to get enough slack to run the cable through the hole on the lever and grip it with vise grips. Wrapped some electric tape around the pliers to ensure it wouldn't pop open and rode from Reno to Butte like that.
 

kwthom

Rider
Premier Member
IBA Member
#43
Most likely there is an internet forum for your bike. Find it and read everything you can and you will likely find out all about potential problems and workarounds.
True. I stirred up quite hornets nest on a forum just recently when I gave the "credit card and cell phone" answer.

Some of those crotchety old guys got quite pi$$ed with I stated "Hey, you're riding a Honda!" - somewhat with tongue in cheek. :D

Tire plugs and a pump, the tools needed to get either wheel off if you have to buy a tire on the trip, and few fuses. Replacement bulbs for tail, brake, and running lights.
I later gave that same exact answer as this is probably what the majority of those that own that motorcycle would need - along with the experience of actually using a tire plug/sticky ropes/whatever in either a real-life roadside incident -or- better yet, in the comfort of your home working area.

The fact that the majority of those reading along on this specific forum has a LOT more miles than most non-IBA riders simply means we get the opportunity to deal with tire issues once a decade or less, as opposed to some that bitch and complain about hauling around a compressor and a patch kit for years without it seeing the light of day.

As far as things like alternators, final drives, and things of that caliber...you can account for 9x% of situations, where is is a digit from 0 to 9. At the point where you CAN'T deal with it, is where you'll again need what I first wrote "credit card and cell phone". :cool:
 

Lanval

Well-Known Member
#45
This is not exactly a spare you need to carry but seriously considering carrying one. An umbrella. Yes a small umbrella.

Let me explain, if you are riding through any area which is hot, with possibly no shade a small umbrella might be your friend. Something you do not have to always carry, but a consideration if you are riding into certain areas.
 

EricV

Premier Member
IBR Finisher
#47
This is not exactly a spare you need to carry but seriously considering carrying one. An umbrella. Yes a small umbrella.

Let me explain, if you are riding through any area which is hot, with possibly no shade a small umbrella might be your friend. Something you do not have to always carry, but a consideration if you are riding into certain areas.
I would state that as "A method of providing shade if you are stuck waiting for a while." I carry a folded up emergency shelter that can quickly be tied to the bike and weighted with a couple of rocks or other items found in my pannier. It was just some cheap item I found at a hardware store a long time ago. I couldn't point you to an example w/o googling around now. I also carry a space blanket in my tank bag. Takes up very little room. Too light to provide shade, but good for other things.

Understanding when to create shade for yourself and being able to keep yourself hydrated and comfortable in adverse conditions while stuck can be a life saving issue.
 
#48
The umbrella/shade was a good idea. I have a mini-brella in my top box because I am a kind of hoarder. Some riders put a small ground cloth/tarp under their tool kit that could be either shade/rain/working ground cloth or bike cover. If a rider has a fuse block or other fuse use beyond the stock items, be sure to pack fuses for them too. Some riders will pack 20-40 oz of water remotely with their tools for trips. Thus, critical hydration will be available for breakdowns when the regular hydration units might be very low. Us old guys carry a foam kneeling pad and a collapsible cane too.

Having a 3x5" index card with checklist for breakdown procedures could be a mind saver? Not so much as referring to it mid-breakdown but more so for having done the mental preparation. The writing of the procedure is what sets the decision tree in the rider's mind. Actually having read the owner's manual and high-lighted the parts that seem most useful on the road might set it in the rider's mind so it will be there when needed. Re-reading the card and scanning the manual before a big trip could be a good idea.

Many cables have teflon linings and require no lube. BUT. The cable ends/barrels could use some lube where they set in the levers. Check the strands at the ends to see if any are broke. Setting the bar levers which have no locating pins nor internal wiring loose enough to pivot around the bar during a tip-over rather than snap off could be a trip saver. Do not fear taking a few wraps of duct tape around critical bolts&nuts just because it looks bad. Losing a bolt that one has caught loose and re-tightened for lack of duct tape in case it loosens again makes one feel stoopit.

Motorcycles have been making mechanics out of riders since 1902. Its a learning curve that has to be experienced over time/miles. Don't expect too much out of yourself at first. I didn't know it all when I started out either. Maintaining a sense of humor/adventure has been the most important tool/trait than anything else over the years. If you can smile/laugh when you are in the dark, cold, wet, tired, hungry, thirsty, bug bit while covered in dirt, oily grime and smell real bad to yourownself with a few real aches/pains dripping blood; then you pretty much have what it takes to be a biker for the long run. If your co-rider can do the same, consider yourself to have reached nirvana.
fran
 

cacomly

Premier Member
IBR Finisher
#50
BMW roadside assistance number...no matter what you carry you won't have what you need!
Hmm, I wonder what they will say when they show up and see my Sportster? :)

Also note that I believe their number changed recently so if one does ride a BMW you may wish to confirm.