How do you keep your feet warm?

Firstpeke

Well-Known Member
#21
Absolutely sums it up doesn't it. not cold......

In summer I like to be "cool".... or "not hot"....

As I seldom ride short distances, I tend to wear sports underwear as a base layer, I have different sets for different seasons!
They wash easily in a sink and dry overnight in a warm bathroom when hung up!
Merino wool socks are all season, then it's down to layers, starting with the liners for my textile Goretex oversuit!
I do have a "stitch one piece, but that is really only good for British summers unless you want to look like the Michelin man with all the extra layers to stay "not cold"!!!
It was, however, brilliant for commuting on the bike... step in and zip up!

The heated gear does not come out often, it really needs to be below about 5 deg C, to make it necessary!

I do not ride in snow and ice, got caught out once and it was very painful and expensive and cost me the best bike I ever had, a blue ST1100 ABS/TCS
which had less than 7000 miles on when I bought it and nearly 30,000 on it two years later when I found a patch of ice and totalled it.
 

owl*

Rally Bonus checker
IBA Member
#23
Absolutely sums it up doesn't it. not cold......

In summer I like to be "cool".... or "not hot"....

As I seldom ride short distances, I tend to wear sports underwear as a base layer, I have different sets for different seasons!
They wash easily in a sink and dry overnight in a warm bathroom when hung up!
Merino wool socks are all season, then it's down to layers, starting with the liners for my textile Goretex oversuit!
I do have a "stitch one piece, but that is really only good for British summers unless you want to look like the Michelin man with all the extra layers to stay "not cold"!!!
It was, however, brilliant for commuting on the bike... step in and zip up!

The heated gear does not come out often, it really needs to be below about 5 deg C, to make it necessary!

I do not ride in snow and ice, got caught out once and it was very painful and expensive and cost me the best bike I ever had, a blue ST1100 ABS/TCS
which had less than 7000 miles on when I bought it and nearly 30,000 on it two years later when I found a patch of ice and totalled it.
Sod that - I've got mine on at anything less than about 16C.
 

c10

Well-Known Member
#24
I'm a skinny little guy with low body fat ,and if it wasn't for heated gear I think I would only ride in summer . Heck it was 73F leaving dinner the other night , and turned jacket on low lol . ,I have socks / glove liners heated that attach to jacket . Heated grips too from factory .
Only use socks on sub 45 F .
 
#25
Like firstpeke i wear Alt-berg hoggs and merino wool socks wicks the sweat away from your feet so they don't get cold so before you go down the heated socks route try them.
I also wear merino wool shirt and under crackers same result but with a Keis heated jacket with sleeves to keep your core temperature up as EricV says.
Look at EDZ for merino wool none of this gear is cheap but you only buy it once.
 

owl*

Rally Bonus checker
IBA Member
#26
I think that people who don't suffer from cold feet fail to understand the problem of those that do.
No Altberg boot and wool combination would save me. The only thing (for me) that does is direct heat. I've tried everything else, and spent a lot of money doing so. Heated gear was a revelation and I wish I'd either tried that first, or at the very least, a lot earlier than I did.
 

Shawn K

Professional Cat Confuser
Premier Member
#27
In my experience, I've seen people who've never used heated gear espouse the reasons why they don't need it. But I've never seen anyone use heated gear, experience the advantage firsthand, and decide to go back to the old way.
 
#29
alt berg hogs and merino wool socks for me too. the socks are from EDZ black ones for winter and grey ones for summer )black ones are warmer more wool content) nice and easy to remember. Never had a problem with the feet getting too cold and i don't put on extra socks just one pair. Usually my hands that feel the cold even with heated grips first.
Been talking with some guy over the winter reckons that heated grips and gortex gloves don't mix makes your hands sweat? not really experience this myself. got myself some leather mountaineering mittens which are warmer than bike gloves going to see how they pan out.
still not using the heated gear every one tells me its warmer but i have some reservations about it :-
(a) i don't want to be wire up like a Christmas tree
(b) what happens when there is no electricity? the stuff aint that warm by itself, so a breakdown in a remote location and this would happen on a cold wet and windy night to me wont be fun.
i'll stick with layers its worked so far for me getting the right layers helps quality costs outdoor / mountaineering shops have some really interesting stuff
 

Ian M

Well-Known Member
#30
second time wearing them first time in action (as it was 13 degrees last week) SOCKS
made a real difference, probably more effective than heated gloves at keeping me warm physically and mentally (there is something about having warm feet and toes), better than insoles as all around the toes is heated, no issues with wires - didn't notice them, far better than wiggling my toes to keep them from freezing
purchased slightly over size as i found the actual foot size too small
 

GarminDave

Ex-Arkwright
Premier Member
#31
"
(a) i don't want to be wire up like a Christmas tree
(b) what happens when there is no electricity? "

(a) The modern stuff is a lot better. The wiring for my gloves is built into the sleeves of the jacket. I currently just have one power wire from me to the bike.
(b) It wont work and as you say the gear is not as warm as if you were layered but the more I use it the less problems I get as I know what I'm doing and what works. I now have velcro to ensure the connectors do not part.

As has been previously said those that try heated do not normally go back to layering.