2006 Ducati Red FJR fully farkled

Auburn

Premier Member
#1
The time has come for me to sell the my 2006 FJR with 63,383 miles. I am the 2nd owner, bought with 3100 miles on 2007.
I recently bought a Gold Wing, don't need two bikes in the garage. I am selling this fully farkled with all maintenance up to date. Price is $5,500 without the frankentank with everything listed below, or $6,000 with the frankentank (will include stock tank too). The paint is not perfect and shows normal wear and tear. This bike is ready to go, very dependable. Could easily be used as an IBR rally bike with very little customization by the new rider.

Located in Auburn, WA

Will come with the following:

• New (o miles) Michelin PR5 GT tires installed
• GP Suspension Front forks
• Penske 8987 with remote reservoir w/900# spring for 2up riding – have 800# spring too)
• J&M audio system with the lower cords (you will need to get the helmet speakers for your helmets) w/ mic-mute, includes the blue tooth dongle for link GPS to system. Phone can be run through Garmin.
• Remus slip on exhaust pipes
• V Stream windscreen
• McCruise Cruise control system
• Yamaha top box adapted to GIVI 357 mount
• Russell day long drive and passenger saddles
• Ivan ECU flashed – gets 49 MPG (470 +/- fuel range with frankentank)
• BrakeAway Motorcycle Throttle lock
• FZ-1 mirrors
• Bags Connection tankbag w/ quick release fuel ring adaptor
• Brodie spider eliminator ground harness
• Brodie ignition switch relay mod
• Wired through relay for accessories with blue sea fuse block
• N-Line dash shelf
• Garmin 595 mount (you need to provide your own 590/595 GPS unit)
• LED headlights, turn signals, brake lights with LED flashing relay
• Tapered steering head bearings installed
• Swing arm and relay arm checked and lubricated with marine moly grease
• Ryan Enterprises canyon cages (fronts only)
• Kuryakyn highway pegs
• Dayton LED volt meter
• Heat Demon aftermarket grip heaters
• BMW style hand grips
• NGK Iridium plus installed
• Valve check and adjusted 5K mile ago
• Always run with Yamaha ring free
• ABM handle bar system (will include stock triple tree and bars with sale)
• Front wheel bearings replaced 10K miles ago
• Bushtec hitch and isolated wire harness
• Ignition switch replaced under recall (also have spare new)
• Wynpro Pair block off plates installed
• Wynpro Bigfoot side stand plate
• Wynpro passenger floor boards
• Hugger inner rear fender installed
• ABS test harness switch installed
• Ram mount for Spot 3 tracker (provide your own SPOT tracker)
• Nelson rig half cover
• Oil change and air filter change 100 miles ago.




 

Auburn

Premier Member
#5
Congratulations.
How do you like the new Goldwing, compared to the FJR? Pros, cons?
Two different bikes.
the FJR leans more to the sporting side and the GE is more touring oriented. I ride two up towing a trailer 95% of the time. W

The only reason for us to sell the FJR is because we don’t need two bikes in the garage. We are planning two long distance trips in the next three years that will involve many days is row slabbing it to the East coast and back so we can maximize our time exploring

The biggest difference for me is the anti-dive system on the front forks of the GW which has allowed me to ride the twisties more relaxed. The FJR is no slouch, but riding twisters aggressively means holding myself and my wife against the dive. The GW doesn’t get as much push from the trailer as the FJR when transitioning from the brakes to the throttle when cornering.

Again it it two different riding styles to accomplish the same thing. The GW is almost 200 pounds heavier, but it doesn’t ride like it is that much heavier. Both are very capable machines. If it weren’t for the trips planned I would never have tried a GW. The reason I tried was the FJR could not be dark sided with the Bushtec hitch on, where the GW can. I didn’t want to burn up a rear tire getting to the east coast and another coming home.
 

Auburn

Premier Member
#6
Two different bikes.
the FJR leans more to the sporting side and the GE is more touring oriented. I ride two up towing a trailer 95% of the time. W

The only reason for us to sell the FJR is because we don’t need two bikes in the garage. We are planning two long distance trips in the next three years that will involve many days is row slabbing it to the East coast and back so we can maximize our time exploring

The biggest difference for me is the anti-dive system on the front forks of the GW which has allowed me to ride the twisties more relaxed. The FJR is no slouch, but riding twisters aggressively means holding myself and my wife against the dive. The GW doesn’t get as much push from the trailer as the FJR when transitioning from the brakes to the throttle when cornering.

Again it it two different riding styles to accomplish the same thing. The GW is almost 200 pounds heavier, but it doesn’t ride like it is that much heavier. Both are very capable machines. If it weren’t for the trips planned I would never have tried a GW. The reason I tried was the FJR could not be dark sided with the Bushtec hitch on, where the GW can. I didn’t want to burn up a rear tire getting to the east coast and another coming home.
con: the GW is heavy, mostly felt when slow in a parking lot. The suspension is not as good as my FJR with the GP suspension mod to the front forks, and Penske rear shock. But GW does have a solution with Traxxion but is expensive at $3k. Still may do that.

The GW also gives off A LOT more heat than the FJR so I am working through the heat management aspects yet.
 
#8
Nice bike! Went from an fz1 to an F6B last year and have really enjoyed mine for the two up comfort and long distance. I'm really interested if the trailer holds you back at all. I just started doing these IBA rides in May and my father in law is getting rid of an old 1992 Bushtec trailer that he used to use on his wing. Thinking of picking it up just for the option of carrying more equipment and/or camping gear for the two up trips. Do you still use it on IBA attempts/rides? Does it hold you back in anyway? I was mostly concerned about MPG, handling, and potential for a trailer flat while on endurance rides.
 

Auburn

Premier Member
#9
Nice bike! Went from an fz1 to an F6B last year and have really enjoyed mine for the two up comfort and long distance. I'm really interested if the trailer holds you back at all. I just started doing these IBA rides in May and my father in law is getting rid of an old 1992 Bushtec trailer that he used to use on his wing. Thinking of picking it up just for the option of carrying more equipment and/or camping gear for the two up trips. Do you still use it on IBA attempts/rides? Does it hold you back in anyway? I was mostly concerned about MPG, handling, and potential for a trailer flat while on endurance rides.
My first Bushtec trailer was a 1992 Turbo (the original one). I paid $1500 for it IIRC.
here is the Turbo trailer - (air shocks are not filled in this picture)


We did our SS1000 2 up pulling our trailer with the FJR riding from Pasco , WA to Williams, AZ in slightly over 18 hours. Trailer pulls just fine.

At that time we carried a spare tire, easy swap in about 5 minutes. I have since converted the tires to tubeless and don't carry a spare. Easy to plug with a sticky string if we had a flat. If we have do another IBA ride, we will most definitely will pull the trailer as we will likely be headed to somewhere that we want to get to and then take our time coming back.

the six person REI tent is behind our 2018 Bushtec Turbo II trailer is shown below (this is in Alaska on the way to Seward)
 
#10
My first Bushtec trailer was a 1992 Turbo (the original one). I paid $1500 for it IIRC.
here is the Turbo trailer - (air shocks are not filled in this picture)


We did our SS1000 2 up pulling our trailer with the FJR riding from Pasco , WA to Williams, AZ in slightly over 18 hours. Trailer pulls just fine.

At that time we carried a spare tire, easy swap in about 5 minutes. I have since converted the tires to tubeless and don't carry a spare. Easy to plug with a sticky string if we had a flat. If we have do another IBA ride, we will most definitely will pull the trailer as we will likely be headed to somewhere that we want to get to and then take our time coming back.

the six person REI tent is behind our 2018 Bushtec Turbo II trailer is shown below (this is in Alaska on the way to Seward)
That's awesome. Same trailer, different color. I'm going to pull the trigger on it. Could really come in handy for the long hauls.

Tubeless is a good idea. Although I think changing a tube on it would probably be a cinch as well compared to something like a dual sport flat out on the trail. Thanks for the info/pics.

-Banks
 

Auburn

Premier Member
#11
That's awesome. Same trailer, different color. I'm going to pull the trigger on it. Could really come in handy for the long hauls.

Tubeless is a good idea. Although I think changing a tube on it would probably be a cinch as well compared to something like a dual sport flat out on the trail. Thanks for the info/pics.

-Banks
I put in the rigid ALU 90 degree valve stems. The tires are 6 ply, so they can be a bugger to break the beads on. That is why I went to tubeless and because it is stuff I already carry to take care of flats on the bike.
 
#12
I put in the rigid ALU 90 degree valve stems. The tires are 6 ply, so they can be a bugger to break the beads on. That is why I went to tubeless and because it is stuff I already carry to take care of flats on the bike.
Understood. Will strongly consider going tubeless as I carry same repair equipment though I am running a driveguard run flat on the rear Did you have to seal any other parts of the rim? If you could point me in the direction of the tires you went with would appreciate it.
 

Auburn

Premier Member
#13
I am running these tires on the trailer currently. The ones form Bushtec are about $70 a piece.

I only had to drill the hole on for the stem to go trough on the rim to fit the valve stem, no extra sealing to make them work. These are the valve stems I used, they have rubber seals built in.