Aux fuel tank yes or no.

wully

Brit Butt Tour Admin.
#1
My R1250RT as a fuel range between 270 and 320 miles dependant how it's ridden. Preparing the bike for this years Euro Tour.
I have a question to answer Aux Fuel Tank fit one or not. What are the benefits, longer distances travelled between stops but is that a benefit or a higher hurdle to jump. More fuel doesn't mean not running out. More weight to carry on unmade roads could be trouble.
Were do I get one from, They seem to only be made in the USA but the manufacturers don't want to send them over the pond.
Not sure the route to go starting to edge towards
 

SteveAikens

Premier Member
IBR Finisher
#2
Iron Butt Association limits certified rides to 350 miles between fuel stops.
I average 300 miles before I start looking for fuel on my 2015 RT.
I have a fuel cell on my 2007 RT that would easily move to the 2015 but the difference in a typical certified ride for me would be basically one fast stop.
Personally, I'm not moving what I already have - I'd say it wasn't worth the effort.
 

Shawn K

Professional Cat Confuser
Premier Member
#3
Since you live in the UK, the first thing I wonder is if auxiliary fuel is even value-added in your case.

It's 840 miles from John o' Groats to Land's End, so you can ride over 1/3 of the way across the country on a single tank.

Keep in mind, also, that for any IBA certified ride you'll need to have a DBR within 350 miles anyway, so you're pretty close to that requirement with your stock tank.

Aux fuel tanks look pretty bad ass, but is the expense and work really worth it in the United Kingdom?

Not trying to talk you out of it, so much as I'm genuinely curious.
 

Vlad

Premier Member
#4
I have tank on the back of my 2013 GSA , all up the bikes at 45 liters now. Fuel range is around 750-800 kilometers. I constructed it using a 4 gallon JAZ common rail fuel cell and a second hand GSA back box, but any well made unit would do the trick. The usual plumbing and fittings plumbed in through the vent line in the main tank. Not hard to do. The box locks with a key too same as the ignition. Its removable in 30 seconds.
For me its about flexibility of your movements, it can be a long way between drinks over here, especially at night. 350 mile DBR dockets dont have to be for fuel either.

If there is a fuel limit for the Euro Tour it could get a little trickier to find a cell the right capacity already prefabbed. Not sure if you have drag racing specialists over there but if you do that would be a good place to start.
 
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#5
You'd certainly be able to get one made over here Wully – Phil is probably a good man to check in with, he's had a few fabricated I believe.

Your range there is already pretty good, as to whether it's worth your while spending the time and money to add more it is a different matter altogether. It will certainly give you more flexibility for those middle-of-the-night-in-the-middle-of-nowhere moments.
 

GSears

Premier Member
#6
Iron Butt Association limits certified rides to 350 miles between fuel stops.
I average 300 miles before I start looking for fuel on my 2015 RT.
I have a fuel cell on my 2007 RT that would easily move to the 2015 but the difference in a typical certified ride for me would be basically one fast stop.
Personally, I'm not moving what I already have - I'd say it wasn't worth the effort.
Different considerations for the ET than a certified ride.

http://forum.ironbutt.org/index.php?threads/et-2021-announcement-english.3452/
 
#8
Aux tanks give that advantage of not having to stop for fuel to often but the disadvantages are numerous firstly how big a tank and where are you going to put it? most people go for the pillion area which means a steel constructed tank fairly high up with 3 or 4 gallon quite a bit of weight. plus it takes longer at filling stations you have to fill 2 tanks, and if you use it to the limit you're still looking for fuel in the same circumstances as with a standard tank. plus there's the additional cost. Construction wouldn't be hard but likely to be costly best options i've seen are the ones that replace the pillion seat.
As you rightly point out more weight on un made roads is a pain billy goat tracks seem to be popular with rally masters.
for me 300 mile ish is fine plus getting off the bike and moving around even for a very short time relieves muscle fatigue and i can go further with less fatigue with minnie breaks. it rained yesterday so i considered the options for et21 ?? ive got more issues in using base camp and accommodation etc than i'd really like.
 

Shawn K

Professional Cat Confuser
Premier Member
#9
most people go for the pillion area which means a steel constructed tank fairly high up with 3 or 4 gallon quite a bit of weight
That's always the first "downside" that I hear people mention.

4 gallons of gasoline weighs ~24 pounds. An aluminum fuel cell that size weighs ~20 pounds. Add some extra for mounting hardware.

For reference, it's still lighter - and has a lower center of gravity - than any passenger I've ever carried.
 
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kerrizor

Premier Member
#10
> plus it takes longer at filling stations you have to fill 2 tanks

@stig of the dump the there was 2 things I thought I'd mention, although I don't mean to call you out or anything. First, if you do a time study of what you spend time doing at a stop, I'd wager the overhead of getting off your route, finding an open station with an open pump, fishing out a credit card, etc etc eats up more time than dispensing 4 more gallons of fuel.. my experience is that no matter what kind of stop you're making, there's a sunk cost of stopping that can't be avoided.

Secondly, an extra stop for a SS (or even a BBG, I reckon) likely won't be what ruins the attempt, but.. its kind of like that old Superman movie, where the hacker grabbed all the half-pennies that the bank usually rounds up or down, and ended up with millions. You don't have to save many stops over the course of a multi-day ride or rally to realize savings, and if your goal is to win, you're gonna need to find every edge you can. Saving 6-7 minutes multiple times during an event is a heck of an incentive.
 

GarminDave

Ex-Arkwright
Premier Member
#12
Here is my $0.02 worth Wully.

I've only ever had one Auxiliary Tank on a Buell Ullysses, It was for my Nordkapp to Gibralter (part of my plan to do Deadhorse/Miami) attempt. The Ulysses did not have a great range like your RT and with fuel stations far from each other in the Arctic Circle the comfort the extra miles gave was worth all the downside. I did ride a lot in Scotland and on a Sunday afternoon in the Highlands having extra fuel on tap was a Godsend.

It also looked Bad Arse, I even used to carry a spare kevlar drive belt as the Ulysses was the only Harley powered bike that you could change a broken drive belt at the side of the road (which I had to), that too looked Bad Arse!

I've matured a lot since then and laugh a lot at GS Adventure riders on the Chunnel that look like they are tackling the Road of Bones to Magadan but in fact, are off to Monaco using Peage's.
 

wully

Brit Butt Tour Admin.
#14
Well I've thought about this and have decided no to bother with an aux fuel tank, yes it will look good but I completed the 1st Euro tour on a Triumph scrambler coming in 19th.
So I'm not going to get one. The advantage as I see it, is flexibility at night. I anticipate sleeping then.
Anyway thanks for all your help.
 
#15
> plus it takes longer at filling stations you have to fill 2 tanks

@stig of the dump the there was 2 things I thought I'd mention, although I don't mean to call you out or anything. First, if you do a time study of what you spend time doing at a stop, I'd wager the overhead of getting off your route, finding an open station with an open pump, fishing out a credit card, etc etc eats up more time than dispensing 4 more gallons of fuel.. my experience is that no matter what kind of stop you're making, there's a sunk cost of stopping that can't be avoided.

Secondly, an extra stop for a SS (or even a BBG, I reckon) likely won't be what ruins the attempt, but.. its kind of like that old Superman movie, where the hacker grabbed all the half-pennies that the bank usually rounds up or down, and ended up with millions. You don't have to save many stops over the course of a multi-day ride or rally to realize savings, and if your goal is to win, you're gonna need to find every edge you can. Saving 6-7 minutes multiple times during an event is a heck of an incentive.
yep i agree its more efficient to carry more fuel in theory. in practice somewhat different. very rarely do i require to find fuel of route so its just the stopping time to take into account the additional fuel takes a tad longer to pour in but thats not that big a deal. the benefit for me is the extra stop this means to me maybe one extra fuel stop a day. that extra stop benefits me as per physical fatigue over a multi day ride and it stops me pushing to far without a break. this works for me and i cover more miles more efficiently when i do stop i spend less time stopped and i make better decisions. it sounds wrong but it works .
thats a couple of edges,
 

Daniel

Mile Eater Platinum Not Right Rider
Premier Member
#16
R1200RT -17. Maple Farkles aux tank on the pillion. Terrific! Makes me go the full distance if I have to/want to. YMMW.
 
#17
I like to stop when I want to stop not when I have too for fuel.

I live in Texas so in some areas there can be a long ways between fuel supplies. I like to ride in places where fuel stations are few and far between.

If I lived in the northeast US, and only rode up there, I probably would not consider an auxiliary.

Once I get in the riding mode I don't like to stop until my body says to stop.

A 1.8 gallon auxiliary plus the stock 4.8 gal (I can get 4.9 to 5 on the right slope) on my Honda VTX1300R is enough to get me comfortably to 200 miles. I would like 300 for an IBA Gold ride.

My Yamaha Royal Star Venture S has a 5.9 gallon stock tank but 4 thirsty carbs. I bought a used 5 gallon tank mounted in place of my pillion so I could achieve 300+ miles on a fill. 5 gallons extra is overkill but nice to have extra. I purchased a new 3.5 gallon (takes less room) yet to be mounted in place of the 5 gallon. It should work just fine, especially for extended touring. For anything over a SS1000 I'll use my 5 gallon.

This was my learning curve, my experience with my prefered riding area, and personal requirements. Each person must decide for themselves.
 

OX-34

Premier Member
IBR Finisher
#19
I bought my second Maple Farkles FJR1300 tank in 2013 when Mike Langford was at the helm and Mike it mailed to Australia for about US$250. Happy days and great service :)

My third Maple Farkles FJR1300 tank I had a devil of a time getting home. It was initially sent by Mike from California to New Mexico for me for some small amount that I don't recall :). That bike stayed in the USA. After that Jack in Albuquerque went to "Fed-Ex" it home for me and that started a cascade of refusals and three courier companies saying it was too big. They wouldn't let it be boxed in its original box o_O, then said it was too big for their boxes. Anyway US$1000 :eek: later it arrived downunder.

At about US$2000 total, the tank cost almost as much as I sold the FJR for a couple of years later. The tanks all worked great.:cool:
 

wully

Brit Butt Tour Admin.
#20
I bought my second Maple Farkles FJR1300 tank in 2013 when Mike Langford was at the helm and Mike it mailed to Australia for about US$250. Happy days and great service :)

My third Maple Farkles FJR1300 tank I had a devil of a time getting home. It was initially sent by Mike from California to New Mexico for me for some small amount that I don't recall :). That bike stayed in the USA. After that Jack in Albuquerque went to "Fed-Ex" it home for me and that started a cascade of refusals and three courier companies saying it was too big. They wouldn't let it be boxed in its original box o_O, then said it was too big for their boxes. Anyway US$1000 :eek: later it arrived downunder.

At about US$2000 total, the tank cost almost as much as I sold the FJR for a couple of years later. The tanks all worked great.:cool:
Just listened to your interview on long riders radio about you 9 day trip around Australia or as you called it a trip round your back yard. Very good listen brilliant.
I know it was a while ago but well done. I really enjoyed your recollection of the gravel and the runner, I've had exactly the same situation.
Hope to meet you one day OX.