Double Dark Side

Stephen!

Premier Member
IBA Member
#3
What are folks using for the front tire (double dark) and how does it perform
Using an Avon AM26 on my 2012 K16GTL. Rock solid handling (even through snow). It is slightly larger than OEM but not enough to mess with ABS or DTC. It will, however rub the fender if you don't raise it a little (easily accomplished by elongating the holes, I am told). I learned the hard way. It wasn't rubbing on the stand but apparently it "grew" enough at speed.

 

Patrick Ford

Premier Member
IBR Finisher
#4
Bridgestone BT-45 bias ply 130/70/18 rear tire using the correct rotation from the side of the tire. Works great, gets 24K plus. Took the last one off at 24K with tread left because it was feeling a bit rough.
 

TdLpps

Premier Member
#5
Also running the BT45 on the front of my Wing. It has 10K miles, looks new, handles fine but growls like crazy at lower speeds due to cupping, in spite of constant pressure checks and Centramatics. I'd use it again if a ride required 20K plus without changing but this one's coming off for an OE Bridgestone.
 

Rollin'

Premier Member
#8

TdLpps

Premier Member
#9
"Patrick Ford -- I run the BT 45 at 36 to 38 PSI. I found that works better for me."

I've always run at 38 psi. I did, however, reverse the tread so that it matched the direction that a front tire should run. That may have caused the cupping I have.

My experience is that the tire is great at going a long way before wearing out and rides and handles well at freeway speeds. At lower speeds (-35mph) it is a filling-shaker on my bike -- 2013, Traxxion front and rear, and Centramatics.
 

Patrick Ford

Premier Member
IBR Finisher
#10
I haven't had the low speed problem you described. My tire the same direction as indicated on the sidewall. I read somewhere if the tire runs backwards it won't push the water away.?
 

TdLpps

Premier Member
#11
I pulled my front wheel tonight in order to swap it out for the G709 tomorrow at work. I attempted to take some photos that show the cupping I experienced with the BT45R on the front of my Wing. It was difficult to capture in photos, but a few did.

Each tread block has ended up with low spots of about 1/8" on the trailing edge. When pushing the bike in the garage I could feel each tread block rolling off the low spot and steeping onto the next tread block's high spot.







It may have been because of the direction I chose to run the tire in or it could have been something else. I would run it again if the ride dictated really long life, but for now am going back to the OE Bridgestone.
 

John Cooper

Premier Member
IBR Finisher
#12
I wore out 3 BT45's before giving up. Cupping was a big issue but it seemed if you were super vigilant on pressure it could be avoided. I like th G709 far better. I check the pressure but not every day on a multi-day ride because I am LAZY. G709 is a better match for me.
 

Brodie

New Member
#13
On 12/28/2017 TdLpps wrote:
"Each tread block has ended up with low spots of about 1/8" on the trailing edge. When pushing the bike in the garage I could feel each tread block rolling off the low spot and steeping onto the next tread block's high spot."


Gentlemen
I know this thread is about running a rear motorcycle tire on the front in companion with a car tire in the rear, however there is a sub issue here with tire cupping.

Currently I'm running a General G-Max AS-03 on the back of my '08 FJR Advanced Edition platform. I've been running car tires on my FJRs since late December 2009 with excellent results. However, it does put additional loads on the front tire which reduces their life about 15% in my case. Tire cupping is the reason for changing them earlier. I have run Michelin PR2, PR3, and PR4, and also Perrelli Angels, and the latest one an Avon Storm. The tire most affected was the Avon Storm, because of the cupping wear. This tire has a slender staggered sipe pattern down the center of the tire. Being a long slender sipe there are actually fewer scallops on the tire spaced out at longer intervals.This put the cupping at a rhythmic side to side pattern which noticeably affected the feedback in the handlebars. When running at lower speeds, below 35, it actually tugs at the front end and you can see it watching your hand grips. This constant negative feedback is annoying at the very least, and will add to fatigue when run at higher speeds. Most of the tires I've run were the Michelins, although they also had cupping their sipes are symmetrical about centerline, and did not induce any rhythmic alternating feedback, and also lasted the longest. With the Avon it was noticeable within the first 1000 miles, and only got worse with time and miles; I was glad to get that thing off when it finally wore out.

Keep this in mind when you mount replacement tires on the front end - double dark side or not.

Brodie
 
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