First timer

#1
Decide to give the event a go when I became aware of the RBLR back in Jan.
Only managed 1 practice ride of 400 miles a week before the kick-off. I was slightly concerned that there were only me and 2 others at the 500 c/w start. I was hoping that even though I knew there would be rain, that it would not be RAIN !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! All day.
That's how it panned out, same for everyone. Got round ok and learned A LOT about distance riding and now understand that its more about average mph and fuel stops than big engines and top speed. Next year will be 1000 South c/w and maybe not on the gxxr1000.
What did I take away from the event
1 take a spare nav.
2 don't forget the phone- charge lead
3 take more gloves
4 layer up more than I did, its cold at 6 am at 80mph after an hour or so.
Apart from that many thanks to the staff at Squires, what a lovely bunch, see you nxt year all.
 

Aitch

Active Member
#2
I think its really easy to under estimate how cold it gets on the bike at 1am especially on the northern route. Heated clothing makes it a bit more cosy....:) I also recommend a throttle lock (unless you have cruise control) to helps with right wrist ache.
 
#3
I think its really easy to under estimate how cold it gets on the bike at 1am especially on the northern route. Heated clothing makes it a bit more cosy....:) I also recommend a throttle lock (unless you have cruise control) to helps with right wrist ache.
Thanks bud, overall it went well, I was on a GSXR which wasn't ideal but did the job. One of the side effects early on in the ride were my hands sort of going to sleep, kind of vague sensation of holding on to the grips without any feeling associated. Got used to that. After a few hours it all got fairly comfy once the gloves and boots were soaked, the rain suit started to surrender creating wet zones where you'd rather not have them. All in all once I was settled in it was ok. No ill effects afterwards no aches or pains (apart from a ferocious headache) but that finished after a beer and some scran. Happy days.
 

FJRPilot

Iceni Rallymaster RBLR1000 routemaster
Premier Member
IBA Member
#4
Not necessarily you but many often don't thoroughly read through, take in and remember a lot of the stuff I put in that 'Detailed Information' document that everyone who signs up is supposed to read first then tick to say they've read it. Years ago there wasn't much advice for new riders which is why when we took over the running in 2016 I thought it might help riders get prepared.

I must admit due to similar things that you experienced I change what I wear and take with me during Long Distance rides. Despite it being June after a few hours of riding in the rain it's surprising how cold it can get so I always take two spare gloves with me, one pair are winter gloves. Extra warm layers to put under my jacket, and even a waterproof oversuit and over boots to go over my already gore-tex textile gear too.

I'm glad you enjoyed it as this sort of thing can become addictive. Consider entering one of our rallies too as they're a great experience for navigation exploits. We have an 8 hour novice rally based at Squires this September and they're less demanding than certificated rides as you stop more often. See the 'rallies' tab on the IBA website here: https://www.ironbutt.co.uk/w3/jorvic.php :)
 
#5
Not necessarily you but many often don't thoroughly read through, take in and remember a lot of the stuff I put in that 'Detailed Information' document that everyone who signs up is supposed to read first then tick to say they've read it. Years ago there wasn't much advice for new riders which is why when we took over the running in 2016 I thought it might help riders get prepared.

I must admit due to similar things that you experienced I change what I wear and take with me during Long Distance rides. Despite it being June after a few hours of riding in the rain it's surprising how cold it can get so I always take two spare gloves with me, one pair are winter gloves. Extra warm layers to put under my jacket, and even a waterproof oversuit and over boots to go over my already gore-tex textile gear too.

I'm glad you enjoyed it as this sort of thing can become addictive. Consider entering one of our rallies too as they're a great experience for navigation exploits. We have an 8 hour novice rally based at Squires this September and they're less demanding than certificated rides as you stop more often. See the 'rallies' tab on the IBA website here: https://www.ironbutt.co.uk/w3/jorvic.php :)
Thanks very much, yes it has brought another new dimension into my biking, having done a bit of touring, trackdays, overseas WSB etc events, club rideouts, etc, this is something which has re-ignited my "bike-life" if you know what I mean. Couldn't fault the organisation either, very well set up, reminded me of my Army days which gave it a familiar feel.
Yes the pre ride info was spot on, and next time I will be better prepped, having said that, "you learn faster by making your own mistakes" works well for me.
Well done to all, it was a learning curve, I just need to get my mates interested now.
 

GraemeandSally

RBLR 1000
Premier Member
#6
Always wear heated jacket you don’t need to switch it on and can remove during the day if it gets warm if you don’t have it with you mmmmm you get what I mean
I second what Mark says when you walk down the line of bikes checking you all in you see a lot what some are wearing it makes me think lol
Try a rally it’s easier ( well, the smaller ones are ) and work up to the Brit Butt Rally which runs over 36h
 

Aitch

Active Member
#7
Bladebod - you headache may have been a sign of dehydration. One of the things I found that with the short infrequent stops I was not drinking enough.......
 

FJRPilot

Iceni Rallymaster RBLR1000 routemaster
Premier Member
IBA Member
#9
Bladebod - you headache may have been a sign of dehydration. One of the things I found that with the short infrequent stops I was not drinking enough.......
Another good reason for having a remote hydration system. With a hose that comes up to your handlebars enabling you to drink while on the move.
I used to use a Camelbak bladder mounted inside my tank bag on my FJR with the hose sticking out the side and clipped on. On my GSA now I have a 1 or 1.5 litre Sigg water bottle I can mount in various places with an adapter that allows you to link up lengths of hose. I have a cable retractor on my bars so I can grab the end, have a few sips then it reels back without flapping arround in the wind. Great when you're stopped in traffic in the heat or when pottering through villages etc.

https://sourcetacticalgear.com/hydration-accessories/115-convertube-hydration.html
 
#10
Sounds like I need to get geared up for next years 1000, the headache sometimes comes due to some issue with ear pain with helmet on for long periods which I've had on shorter rides. Seems to be common looking at the forums. Any recommendations for good textiles welcomed.
 

Aitch

Active Member
#11
Another good reason for having a remote hydration system. With a hose that comes up to your handlebars enabling you to drink while on the move.
I used to use a Camelbak bladder mounted inside my tank bag on my FJR with the hose sticking out the side and clipped on. On my GSA now I have a 1 or 1.5 litre Sigg water bottle I can mount in various places with an adapter that allows you to link up lengths of hose. I have a cable retractor on my bars so I can grab the end, have a few sips then it reels back without flapping arround in the wind. Great when you're stopped in traffic in the heat or when pottering through villages etc.

https://sourcetacticalgear.com/hydration-accessories/115-convertube-hydration.html
The downside to a comfy seat and a large tank it can be 3 or 4 hours between stops and I realise now that a couple a quick gulps of water isn't enough. ....something like a water bladder in a tank bag might work. Thanks for the suggestion :)
 

FJRPilot

Iceni Rallymaster RBLR1000 routemaster
Premier Member
IBA Member
#12
Just make sure it's a quality bladder, like a Camelbak as you don't want it leaking over everything else in your bag ;)

Oh, and a 'Go-cruise' throttle lock is really great too. They're far easier to fit and use than those weird ones you mount on the end of the bar and have to twist on as you wind the throttle open. Like you said in an earlier post they're handy so you can let go for a few seconds to shake your hand and get rid of aches. I also use 'grip puppies' which are foam bar covers. These add a bit of comfort and can help with vibration etc.