hoppers downunder

Gatey

Premier Member
#4
Ron mate you should put some thought into teaching the rest of us how to deal...in the moment and shortly after with prangs.
Really. Not being stupid here but you do have a survival skill, knack and time on your hands to put together some very good life experience to offer the rest of us.
So very glad your ok mate.
 

Grey Gentry

Premier Member
#5
Ron mate you should put some thought into teaching the rest of us how to deal...in the moment and shortly after with prangs.
Really. Not being stupid here but you do have a survival skill, knack and time on your hands to put together some very good life experience to offer the rest of us.
So very glad your ok mate.
Gatey, I find I'm very measured in the avoidance of such incidents. No panic, just do what you have to do. Swerve, brake. I do go to Roadsafe Rider training every year to keep the skills up. The lack of panic, maybe due to medication? No adrenaline rush anymore.
Leading Marls, Reg and Daisy east from BV (Border Run), had to dodge a 'roo that decided to turn back in the dawn west of Nullabor Roadhouse. As I was passing, I was expecting impact with the pannier....but then realised I did have it on. Did I stop? Nope, job done, carry on. I did check the mirrors for the other riders safety.
But a little wallaby did knock my front wheel which caused me to crash a couple of years back. I know I could have braked harder, but I did not want to hit it under full braked. With the ABS maybe?
On the VFR about 12 month ago, a 'roo was coming down a cutting. All I thought was impact. Full brake, closed my eyes even, but it didn't happen. Opened my eyes, as I eased the brakes, the bugger was straight in front of me. Back on the brakes, stalled, as it hopped away up the other side of the cutting. I'd been practising ABS stops at the Roadsafe training. It works.
I do, when the road is empty, practice swerving, while line to white line at the speed limit. You need to know how hard, and how much you can turn, and then correct to stay on the road. Practice dodging. I'm sure Mr Plod would frown, if seen, so take care when. It also helps take the edges off the flat spots on the rear we get on long rides, as well as reduce the boredom, momentarily.
Thanks for the good wishes too.
 

Rusjel

Premier Member
#6
Thanks for the guidance Ron and like Chris, glad you're o.k.

I have different loads and tires on the Kato all the time for the riding I do, so practicing a quick lane change and emergency stop on the bitumen and the gravel shortly after I set off on a ride is standard procedure for me.
 

Biggles

Premier Member
#7
It looks like the rider was lucky the roo landed on its feet just behind him. I think it would have done serious damage if it landed on him.
The rider looks to be going fairly slowly- basically coasting on level ground. You have to wonder why the roo hit him. Don't they look where they're going?
 

Grey Gentry

Premier Member
#8
Just updating this thread. Taken down by another 'roo on the VFR shortly after leaving Wentworth on the Silver City Hwy. Too close to miss, so decided to brake as hard as I could to reduce the crash speed. Seemed to work, as after I was helped to get the bike back onto it's wheels, I rode it home. Insurance notified me today they are happy to repair the VFR.
 

Gatey

Premier Member
#10
I was in the Bylong Valley a couple of weeks back. It stinks of dead roos and drying hides from Singleton to Illford and out by Windeyer.
In places the country looks good.
Now with some dry sown blocks shooting, the passage of roos from the cover into those crops will be noteworthy.
Good to read your OK Ron.