Speed versus time question

FLHXHS

Active Member
#1
Ok:

Δ Distance = Speed * Time.

In the case of a BBG, Distance = 1500 mi, Speed = X, and Time =<24hr. So: 1500 mi ÷ 24 hr = 62.5 mph.

However, you need to stop for gas and potentially dehydrate/rehydrate on occasion also. I say don't eat [much] - If you don't eat you don't

It seems my 2020 Harley-Davidson touring gets 38.75 mpg. Based on a little bump room, at 5.5 gal [USGal] = 213.125 miles per tank. Assuming 200 / fuel stop, 1500 mi ÷ 200 = 7.5 fuel stops = 8 stops. 8 Stops @ 10 min = 80 minutes so 24 hr - 80 minutes = 22hr40min.
1500 mi ÷ 22hr40min = 66.1765 mph [106.5 km/h] average moving speed.
National Parks the speed is always 90 km/hr - so 99 km/h or 61.52 mph. If a National Park gets in your way, you have to make up the time somewhere...

My question is at what speed do the speed tax collectors give you a pass..?
Here in Canada - 10% is doable, but just looking at everyone else's percentage/comfort/give a hoot level..?

Please forgive the winter thread. [This is my attempt at avoiding shovelling the driveway.]
 

Amnon Romano

Premier Member
#2
In Israel, below 21 Km/h above, it doesn't count against your record, so the cops don't bother. Now, for technical reasons, they are obligated to reduce 5 Km/h for accuracy. So, it is socially "acceptable" to ride no more than 25 Km/h (≈15.5 mph) above posted.
 

Firstpeke

Well-Known Member
#4
This, of course, is where route planning becomes somewhat more important.... using roads where the posted limits are above the required minimum average by a reasonable amount...

In the UK it is becoming increasingly difficult to do any longer IBA rides or the insanity level rides, simply because the roads during most daytime periods are congested, so overnight sections become more crucial.... the growing use of gantry cameras and average speed cameras on roads too!

Anyone in mainland Europe want to comment on the conditions in Holland, Germany, Belgium, France, Spain, Portugal, Italy, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Finland?
Norway/Sweden being particularly of interest for rides such as the European End to End?
Finland would be expensive if caught speeding as I believe fines are based on income!
 

FLHXHS

Active Member
#5
In Israel, below 21 Km/h above, it doesn't count against your record, so the cops don't bother. Now, for technical reasons, they are obligated to reduce 5 Km/h for accuracy. So, it is socially "acceptable" to ride no more than 25 Km/h (≈15.5 mph) above posted.
I've not ridden outside of North America, but interesting to know. I don't know, but is Israel hilly/mountainous, or lots of straights? Based on your ride map, you've ridden all over the place... :)

10% or flow of traffic around you.
Typically what I do, but just ensuring I'm not missing something - I'm not running a detector...

This, of course, is where route planning becomes somewhat more important.... using roads where the posted limits are above the required minimum average by a reasonable amount...

In the UK it is becoming increasingly difficult to do any longer IBA rides or the insanity level rides, simply because the roads during most daytime periods are congested, so overnight sections become more crucial.... the growing use of gantry cameras and average speed cameras on roads too!

Anyone in mainland Europe want to comment on the conditions in Holland, Germany, Belgium, France, Spain, Portugal, Italy, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Finland?
Norway/Sweden being particularly of interest for rides such as the European End to End?
Finland would be expensive if caught speeding as I believe fines are based on income!
In Canada - trying for a BBG will be pretty tough. When I did the Vancouver Island 1600K, Mike Kneebone and I were chatting, and he called it a tough haul to get it under 24 hours, as the roads are so slowwwww...

I asked the question as I came across the Trans Canada "record" and was curious what speed was executed to achieve that. Western Canada - specifically Alberta to the MB/ON you can open 'er up, so long as the deer and the antelope aren't playing too much...

10% is probably pretty good. Those looking at BC for a ride - check DriveBC - the washouts killed the Coquihalla. It will be a bit before it is opened again. I'm re-routing to the Sea-to-Sky I think...

Have a good one
H

p.s. - I cleared the driveway...
 

Russ Black

Premier Member
#6
Except through small towns I usually do 10 over. Faster if a rabbit passes me. The 10 minutes for the fuel stop is not the time your stopped at the pump pumping fuel. It's the time when you first let off your throttle to exit until your back up to speed on the highway. When I ride solo, the data from my past rides tells me that I need to bumped mine up to 12 to 15 minutes for my fuel stops unless I just fill up and not log anything. I am now using 12 during daylight and 15 during hours of darkness.

Russ
 

Amnon Romano

Premier Member
#7
Iis Israel hilly/mountainous, or lots of straights?
Well, Israel is a 270mile long 50mile wide triangle, that is mainly hills/mountains/backroads - except for a 100mile stretch in the center, along the Mediterranean coast. That makes it M/C heaven as well as IBA nightmare! A simple SS1K can not be completed below 19 hours, and typically takes 20-22 hours. Gold/Insanity rides are out of the question...
 

FLHXHS

Active Member
#8
Except through small towns I usually do 10 over. Faster if a rabbit passes me. The 10 minutes for the fuel stop is not the time your stopped at the pump pumping fuel. It's the time when you first let off your throttle to exit until your back up to speed on the highway. When I ride solo, the data from my past rides tells me that I need to bumped mine up to 12 to 15 minutes for my fuel stops unless I just fill up and not log anything. I am now using 12 during daylight and 15 during hours of darkness.
Russ
I may have to reconsider my timing for fuel stops. Usually, I'm pre-packed with snacks, and go when it's time to. I shoot for 10 minutes with the planning stage. I was hoping to get it down.


Well, Israel is a 270mile long 50mile wide triangle, that is mainly hills/mountains/backroads - except for a 100mile stretch in the center, along the Mediterranean coast. That makes it M/C heaven as well as IBA nightmare! A simple SS1K can not be completed below 19 hours, and typically takes 20-22 hours. Gold/Insanity rides are out of the question...
I suppose I could look at google maps a little closer... But asking the question gets your local perspective ... :)

I think I'm gonna stick with +10% and focus on keeping my fuel stops to a minimum timeline and efficient. 90 km/h through a National Park [or most of Ontario] is what it is.

H
 

Mike721

Premier Member
#10
In the US know your specific states, for example in NJ the left lane is often going 15+ over with LEOs sitting in the median and it's a non issue, but VA is notorious for pulling people over at 10 MPH over the limit, many times I've heard the VA troopers operate on "9 your fine, 10 your mine" rule. Pennsylvania varies, I'm never sure what is acceptable. Lacking local knowledge, I blend into the fast lane and hide between the larger vehicles. This has worked for 2 BBGs and a SS2000G with no issues. Efficient fuel and rest stops are the secret, drink a lot, eat a little, pee quickly, don't poop on the clock if possible, keep stopped time to a minimum, and have a big gas tank.
 

Gerry Arel

Premier Member
IBR Finisher
#11
10 minute stops are the devil in your details.

Sure maybe one or 2 could take longer with bio breaks etc, but you should be able to get in/out in far less time. Maybe save 5 minutes in each? Thats 40 more minutes of riding with your 8 stops.
 
#12
There is no definitive answer. Legally, you can be ticketed at 1mph over the speed limit. I am not aware of any official statute in the US that gives you a leeway, though I have seen official policies for some departments that do. There was a town in the south that was notorious for writing tickets if you were driving the speed limit +2/3mph. One officer I met had a personal policy of +14mph, which to me was mind-blowing, but he worked a highway, so maybe he would just be too busy otherwise.

Personally, and for no reason other than 'just because,' I stick to about 4 over on my motorcycle. To me that seems like a margin of error most police will give you on their radar. My truck is tracked for insurance, so no speeding there o_O
 

cacomly

Premier Member
IBR Finisher
#13
Ok:

Δ Distance = Speed * Time.

In the case of a BBG, Distance = 1500 mi, Speed = X, and Time =<24hr. So: 1500 mi ÷ 24 hr = 62.5 mph.

However, you need to stop for gas and potentially dehydrate/rehydrate on occasion also. I say don't eat [much] - If you don't eat you don't

It seems my 2020 Harley-Davidson touring gets 38.75 mpg. Based on a little bump room, at 5.5 gal [USGal] = 213.125 miles per tank. Assuming 200 / fuel stop, 1500 mi ÷ 200 = 7.5 fuel stops = 8 stops. 8 Stops @ 10 min = 80 minutes so 24 hr - 80 minutes = 22hr40min.
1500 mi ÷ 22hr40min = 66.1765 mph [106.5 km/h] average moving speed.
National Parks the speed is always 90 km/hr - so 99 km/h or 61.52 mph. If a National Park gets in your way, you have to make up the time somewhere...

My question is at what speed do the speed tax collectors give you a pass..?
Here in Canada - 10% is doable, but just looking at everyone else's percentage/comfort/give a hoot level..?

Please forgive the winter thread. [This is my attempt at avoiding shovelling the driveway.]
Actually it's 7 stops since the last one is the end of the ride. Also you are assuming you don't need another stop for the purpose of marking a corner in your route. Normally if you do not make yourself stand out by going faster than the flow of traffic you should be fine. Of course motorcycles tend to stand out but not much you can do about that.
 

Stephen!

Fly Guy
Premier Member
IBA Member
#14
. I am not aware of any official statute in the US that gives you a leeway,
MCA 61-8-303

(2) A vehicle subject to the speed limits imposed in subsection (1) may exceed the speed limits imposed in subsection (1) by 10 miles an hour in order to overtake and pass a vehicle and return safely to the right-hand lane under the following circumstances:
(a) while traveling on a two-lane road; and
(b) in a designated passing zone.
 

Stephen!

Fly Guy
Premier Member
IBA Member
#15
Am I the only one who (outside of certain Nevada-based events) rarely exceeds the posted limits by more than 2 or 3 mph? (Except when partaking in MCA 61-8-303(2), of course... :p)
 

Shawn K

Professional Cat Confuser
Premier Member
#16
Am I the only one who (outside of certain Nevada-based events) rarely exceeds the posted limits by more than 2 or 3 mph? (Except when partaking in MCA 61-8-303(2), of course... :p)
Nope, you're not the only one. I still have a commercial driver's license, and unfortunately the penalties for road infractions can be up to 4X the penalties for the average motorist. They can also affect my ability to obtain employment in the future due to the impact on my CSA score.

So most of the time, I need to cool it.

There was that one time, though, on SR-376 in Nevada...
 

Stephen!

Fly Guy
Premier Member
IBA Member
#17
Nope, you're not the only one. I still have a commercial driver's license, and unfortunately the penalties for road infractions can be up to 4X the penalties for the average motorist. They can also affect my ability to obtain employment in the future due to the impact on my CSA score.

So most of the time, I need to cool it.

There was that one time, though, on SR-376 in Nevada...
Hahaha... Despite what my sig line says, I have had one ticket on a motorcycle since I started street riding in 1992. It was for "80 in a 70" in Montana, of all places. Not sure what that Trooper was really after that day, but I am convinced it was my John Ryan sticker that really garnered me the ticket.
 
#18
Well, I think that calculating 10 minutes for every stop is a good strategy. You don't have to take the full 10' at every stop, so you could build up a kind of reserve for eventualities. A sort of building an "ease of mind" as you will. I didn't do an official IBA ride as yet, but I know that the later you are in your ride, the more time you need to get back on the bike. Those minutes spared in the beginning could come in handy at the end.
As far as speed is concerned, I don't know much about your situation, but over here where I live (Belgium) we are confronted with speed controlling systems that measure one's average speed over a certain distance (traject controle). Makes the equation somewhat interesting! That is the reason why I regularly hop over to the German autobahn ;)
Stay Safe..
Ed.
 

Dogpoope

Premier Member
#19
Lives in Sweden and mostly police never says anything if you stay around 10-15% over. We do have cameras though. A heck of them and mostly in those parts of the route where you, in theory, could save some time.
For some reason they love 2+1-roads (some miles with one lane and then you get 900-2000meters with two lanes before it goes back to one again) on the east coast. So if you plan for a European E2E, take that into consideration. Also pretty much wildlife, reindeers and worst of all: EPA kids. They drive their car in 20-22mph and absolutely r e f u s e to get to the side and let you by.