Speed vs Distance Examples

kwthom

Rider
Premier Member
IBA Member
#1
Some of the newer readers may have a bit of difficulty with the speed vs distance equation...so a few brain cells later, the PDF attached to this post hopefully explains this using a 'real life' (okay, hypothetical) data set. The forum won't allow me to post the Excel worksheet, but this PDF is adequate to explain these examples.

I've computed a hypothetical hour of general-purpose LD riding. The speeds are the same (70MPH - think cruise control on a flat road with no wind!) and this hour of time has been done these four ways intentionally. The chart on the first page of the PDF simply shows a plot of these four examples. For this hypothetical hour at the end of each minute the speed, the distance you traveled in miles for that minute, and the most pertinent data column, the aggregate distance traveled.

The bottom of each table explains in a little more detail about the scenario that I have run in each case. Good, clean getaway from a fuel stop - or starting the first hour of a ride is in Example A. The next shows just some periodic, brief, slight slowdowns in the same first hour as Example B. The third Example C shows a bit of a time drain in a less-than-clean getaway, due to traffic. The final Example D simply shows what a nine minute fuel stop does to that same hour of time with respect to the overall average speed.

String 15, 16, or more of these hypothetical hours together, and you'll have an Iron Butt ride! :cool:
 

Attachments

BMW RT Pilot

Premier Member
#4
I took mine out for the 1st time in about 3 months, since the whole D thing started...battery was completely dead, bike needed washing (duh), tank was empty so I added some fuel line cleaner because why not?, rode the bike to the station about 7 miles away and it wouldn't restart at first. Rode another 100 miles, brought it home, cleaned off the bugs and leaving it on the charger. GPS was dead- wouldn't even turn on and then it was over 5 hours off on the time. Took it about ten minutes before correcting itself. But the weather was nice (low 70s), so I didn't need much more than sweatpants and a LS shirt, plus helmet and gloves. I need to plan either 2 BBGs or one 3,400+ mile ride to get to 48K to hit the next service interval. I'm just typing the random things popping into my head without checking for clarity. :)
 

BMW RT Pilot

Premier Member
#6
I've always planned my rides with Garmin Basecamp. I simply put 10min layover at each stop and the arrival time is pretty accurate.

YMMV
I agree and I think I mentioned something like that in another thread as well. Basecamp is useless unless you delve into a few areas and make some adjustments, like adding layover times as you suggested (I add 20 minutes per). Once you transfer the data into the GPS, double check the route and times and make adjustments as needed because the GPS WILL make its own tweaks.
 
#7
I agree and I think I mentioned something like that in another thread as well. Basecamp is useless unless you delve into a few areas and make some adjustments, like adding layover times as you suggested (I add 20 minutes per). Once you transfer the data into the GPS, double check the route and times and make adjustments as needed because the GPS WILL make its own tweaks.
It's important that you have enough waypoints to make sure the GPS recalculates the same route.
If you use the curvy road option in basecamp you need to make sure that your GPS has this option too. (Not my Zumo 350)
You must also have the same map version on both.
Basecamp uses lower speeds than the speed I tend to ride, that's why 10min is enough for me. On the other hand the Zumo seems a bit optimistic.
By using the Basecamp time, I'm sure that my arriving time will not be later that the one given by the software.
The latest version (4.7.1) doesn't link with Google Earth anymore but I found an app where you can copy and paste any basecamp waypoint into and it will show them in Google Earth.. It's called BC2GE

YMMV
 
#10
I never understood the need to export to GE.
I find it very useful to check the area that I plan to stop at.
Sometimes the GPS will mention a gas station that doesn't exist anymore. This helps verify that it's there.
Also it helps me find a safe area where I can stop for a break.
 
#11
I've always planned my rides with Garmin Basecamp. I simply put 10min layover at each stop and the arrival time is pretty accurate.
YMMV
Because this thread is aimed at newer riders to LD riding, I started out using 12 min as a target for fuel stops. Getting a fuel stop in less than 12min is good and comforting early in a ride. Knowing that it can be done in 12min nearing the end of a ride when one is tired and slower is even more self affirming. Riders can work the timing tighter as experience is gained.
 
#13
My bike is pretty slow as am I. Some days I never see 70mph. Heck, I can ride a whole tank of fuel (if not several in a row) and never see 70mph. BBG pace is only 63mph. Figuring fuel stops, the desired pace might be a mere 66mph. My Sigma has little arrows to let me know if I am above or below the desired pace. Somewhere on this forum, a rider documented a BGG w/o exceeding 65mph. That's some pretty tight time/distance management skillz.
 

Stephen!

Premier Member
IBA Member
#14
Somewhere on this forum, a rider documented a BGG w/o exceeding 65mph. That's some pretty tight time/distance management skillz.
That sounds like an absolutely fantastically fun challenge. On a day-to-day basis I very rarely exceed the posted limits. I just do not think I have the discipline to get stuck behind someone doing 60mph in a 65 zone and NOT whip out to pass them at Mach 3.

:p
 

Clive Rand

Premier Member
#15
I am fairly new to this group, 70mph in a lot of places is a speeding fine and demerit points from our licenses here in Queensland, Australia. and it would seem the chances of getting caught are forever improving with speed cameras all over the place. there are a few places where we can get close to those speeds, but then we get hit with a muriad of constantly varying speeds as we approach townships, life can get a bit of a headache. We need to maintain a maximum speed of 100Kph on most of our roads, that is around 62.14mph. My biggest hang up for long distance riding is roadworks, and some of them can burn a whole lot of time, chugging along at 40Kph (almost 25mph) for an hour or more does my head in big time, riding against the clock never dawned on me how much time is burned until I tried it. I will be looking at a lot of other options in the future, and these certicate rides has shown me that having some knowledge of the roads ahead can be a lot more valuable than times at the servo or road speeds.
 

OX-34

Premier Member
IBR Finisher
#16
Somewhere on this forum, a rider documented a BGG w/o exceeding 65mph. That's some pretty tight time/distance management skillz.
I've done a handful of BBGs (including metric BBGs at +1550miles) on roads with a max of 110kph (68.3mph). It is very uncomfortable to sit in that narrow range for 24 hours on highly policed Oz roads. The bike choice can make a difference, but I found a few that were up to the task:











 

jeffrey gebler

Premier Member
IBR Finisher
#17
I have done three BBG's here in Australia and have to agree with Ox on how uncomfortable it is to sit on our low speed limits here for 24 hrs with the ever constant presance of police, cameras, radars and also contending with the constant threat of wildlife.