Toolkit

saphena

IBAUK Webmaster
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#1
Here's a picture of the toolkit I carry on my bike. Yes it's enough to let me do almost anything I might need out on the road (obviously I carry gaffer tape and cable ties as well :)) and it will shortly include some sort of extending magnetic mirror pickup thingy and some heavy gauge wire in lieu of a bent coathanger.


These are either end shots of the bit of tubing used as a torque extender



I needed to adjust my chain on the way back from Romania and I could [just] crack the wheel nut (last tightened by a professional mechanic using a 6' bar) but it was the devil's own job tightening it up afterwards. My first attempt had me readjusting my chain after a few miles and I spent some while getting that extra quarter turn in.

I'd really like to carry something to give me a bit more welly for that job and while the obvious answer is a separate 24mm spanner with an 18 inch handle I thought some of you might have some bright ideas.

What's the most useful and convenient thing I could add to that kit?
 

FJRPilot

Brit Butt Rallymaster RBLR1000 routemaster
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#3
Bob, if you have to adjust your chain on-the-go you could consider a length of smallish diameter steel tube, then squeeze the end in a vice so it will fit over your tool kit's existing 24mm spanner. The tube could then be cable tied to your frame, slid under the seat area, or stored in a topbox/pannier etc. When I get my tyres changed I now insist the mechanics tighten the wheel nuts to the specified torque and not to use a big old length of pole as I've seen them do in the past. As you say, on the side of the road access to such leverage is not usually an option. Failing that you can sometimes crack the nut undone by giving the spanner a quick blow using something like a rock or big stone. Or just carry a mallet with you :D
 

Megabuck

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#6
I've got something which fits the bill; it's best described as an extending 1/2" drive breaker bar. I'm on holiday this week so I can't post photos; in its compact form it's maybe a foot long (so it would need to go in pannier or topbox rather than under the seat), and extends to around 18 to 20 inches. Don't ask me where you can get one - it was given to me.

Regards,
Martin
 
#7
it s amazing how few tools you carry suppose it depends on the age of the bike and what you are prepared to repair at the side of the road. I carry some what more don't use them much but they are with me on long runs. As for the 24mm spanner we always tend to go for longer spanner / socket bar if the nut is some what tight, this works but you end up carrying a larger tool or selection of them as the case may be. Putting your foot to it can solve the problem that works as well. Past experience and you cant always get the extra leverage in the gap available or as is my case just not got much room in the pannier any more this is down to poor packing and carrying more than I need . so an alternative answer is use a flogging spanner use these on ships where you have little room and big nuts/bolts basically a ring spanner with a very short handle and belt it round with a large hammer torque loading is crude distance you move it with said hammer. your toolkit would lend itself to this simple solution just need something to hit the spanner with, any handy large object would do or cut down a hammer.

Before you say I have all the right tools but not always with you are they and this has made me remember I have to review my packing and what I'm actually carrying and why. There have been comments on how I fill both panniers etc and not actually have much with me. probably end up with extra stuff at the end of this exercise
 
#12
Since i changed to a BMW R 1200 GS which has the canbus system so i don't need fuzes the system will tell you what the fault is,if that goes wrong recovery to the nearest BMW dealer.
I have got all led lights including the head light and indicators from Cyclops in USA i had a led rear light on my previous GS that had been on it for seven years when i sold it so no need for spare bulbs.
stop and go tyre plugger and a Slime compressor and the basic BMW tool kit Plus a spare fuel pump controller they are prone to to problems, keeps the weight and the amount of crap you carry around.
 

saphena

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#13
I forgot to mention puncture repair stuff which I also carry. I have recently upgraded that to include a Rocky Creek motopressor but I'm curious about Stop and Go tyre plugger - do many like that particular kit and if so what else have you tried and why do you like Stop n Go?
 
#14
Not had to use the stop and go yet but i watched another biker use one as he was using my compressor
simple to use no glue involved.
 

FJRPilot

Brit Butt Rallymaster RBLR1000 routemaster
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#15
I forgot to mention puncture repair stuff which I also carry. I have recently upgraded that to include a Rocky Creek motopressor but I'm curious about Stop and Go tyre plugger - do many like that particular kit and if so what else have you tried and why do you like Stop n Go?
I've got the Stop-n-Go kit and used it in anger three times. Twice when I had the luxury of dicovering a flat rear tyre in my garage after a ride and once out on the road. Each time it's been easy enough to fix the puncture. So I can't compare it with anything else as this was the first ever kit I bought. The biggest headache is always blowing the tyre back up. I've got compressors and CO2 bulbs. I now carry the gas bulbs as they take up less space and I secrete many around the bike. Some are in my alloy tool box and another 6 are in a pouch under the seat.
 

biquer

Premier Member
#16
One thing to consider is the quality of your compressor. I carried a digital-display Ring compressor @ £25 for years but I thought that something smaller would be better, saving some space. After having used both at the side of the road and waited forever for a red hot, spluttering, cheap compressor to do something that the Ring one does in a fraction of the time, the cheap one was given away. No experience with stop-n-go. I've used gummy worms on the road 3 times, 2 times successfully and 1 time only partially successful, but that was multiple holes and I was still able to limp home.
 
#18
got a fairly good small compressor at the bike show last year inflates the tyre much faster than the small plastic one I had before think its of Australian origin.
 
#20
yep great minds etc. just been reading a magazine from 2012 and in its reviewed a mini foot pump from nippy normans looks bigger and is more expensive alright if you don't want to use your battery though.