June 50cc help

John Cooper

Premier Member
IBR Finisher
#41
I'm in line with your thinking. Adrenaline is part of my go power. Not chemicals. Thanks John Cooper for that app. Its on my phone and already put to work. BTW- I'm running from JAX to SD, sorry i didnt put that earlier but the info applies the same. I'm really getting exited to do this thing
On the mobile, it is very cool because it knows where you are and which direction you are headed so it can show you what is ahead of you. I go the tip on using it from Danny Dosman, another LD rider.
 

John Cooper

Premier Member
IBR Finisher
#42
To Wingnut1's comment on chemicals; I am only a social coffee drinker so caffeine (the most used psychoactive drug in the U.S.) gives me a real pop. On long rides, I often use 5-hour which is similar to a cup of coffee but taste like kerosene and can be downed in-motion.
 

Garage Monster

Premier Member
IBA Member
#43
Matthew. Good luck to you. I sold my Hayabusa a little over two years ago after several IBA rides. I also camp toured on it many summers. I had installed real cruise control, heated seat by Laam, heated grips, Lowered pegs and Heli bars. In the end I had hard bags. I attempted a 50CC SD to JAX 3 years ago. Half way across AZ on Saturday afternoon a front wheel bearing exploded the cage. I turned and headed back to Oregon and made it with a wobble. I now ride a K1200LT for more wind protection as at 71 I get cold easier. I hope to do a 50CC this April. Trying to decide how far. SD to JAX is the shortest but the farthest from Oregon. I also have routes planned from Santa Monica Pier across and from Golden Gate Park in San Francisco. Each a little longer than the first but closer to home. I did the 4 corners about 11 years ago and have ridden the SD to JAX route and am looking for variety.

For planning I use Streets and Trips and Google maps combined. Google maps let me switch to earth view and go to street view and actually see the stops. I always get the phone number and call to verify hours of operation before I leave. It helps with stations closed due to change in hours or other issues. Good luck to you. I guess I need to decide my route soon.
 
#44
A friend just turned me on to this thread as I am planning a 50cc in mid-February. I havent done a 50cc before so planning this from scratch is a little interesting. I have read all the hints you gave and applied them to my trip as best as possible. The challenge right now is gas stops in West Texas. What gas locations work for you? My steed is a new BMW R1200RT. I'm not really sure what kind of range i'll get out of my tank as I only have 300 miles on the bike now but I cant see why I cant get at least 225 out of a tank. So far I have been trying to keep it around 180 miles per stop. Basecamp doesnt show much in the way of gas in West Texas
Good luck - the planning for a 50cc or 100ccc is pretty straight forward; especially from a route perspective. I'm just outside San Diego so let me know if you need assistance. Generally, I do all my trip planning in Google Maps, save as a GPX file, import to Basecamp, change from track to route and finally send to GPS. It is a few extra steps; but I find trip planning/routing in Google much easier. Plus I have the route available to me on the mobile My Map app which provides another contigency layer if my my primary and secondary GPS fail. I have my 100ccc (San Diego-Jax-San Diego) trip I completed last year I could send you as a reference. PM me if you want it.
Scott
 

JAORE

Premier Member
#45
Lot's of good info here! I'm going to try a 50cc this year. My first attempt was thwarted by a mechanical issue.

FWIW
I'm a premium member. The perks are pretty cool, especially the expedited approval. But just tossing a bit of financial support to the IBA is worth while IMO.

On my last certified ride I set up Spotify and Bubbler for my tracking. Unfortunately my cellphone came off the USB in the dark of the night within my tour pack. Dead phone = no track after a few hundred miles. Fortunately I'd had my wife - an IBA member too - sign my witness form before the ride (no, I don't always wear a belt and suspenders).

Frankly, I have never had a problem with witnesses, especially with the flexibility provided by IBA (e.g. can get a witness the day before or the day after, particularly if start/finish times are O'Dark Thirty.

So, my FREE, Free, free advice is: 1) become a Premium member - you'll feel good about it, 2) get your witnesses on paper unless it's a huge burden, and 3) ride safe.
 

kwthom

=o&o>
Premier Member
IBA Member
#46
I got so out-of-sequence on the first part of my one-and-only 50CC, that I was flying by the seat of my pants from Florida to just east of Houston. The good news is, there's plenty of opportunities in that stretch to get fuel and bio-breaks in the ride. The couple of breaks I *had* to make early on (sleepy monster, bio-break) made me focus on many of those things that you read about in Ride Reports [so, how did so-and-so remedy this problem?]. Once those were overcome, then it became a bit of a game (how do I need to ride to be able to rejoin my plan?). Having studied the route - both via Google Maps and by tools that Greg Rice and others have provided, it turned that "Oh, s***!" moment into a "Hey, I got this figured out!" moment.

It took about ten hours to get to that point, however. :)

"Patience, grasshopper!"
 

cacomly

Premier Member
IBR Finisher
#47
I got so out-of-sequence on the first part of my one-and-only 50CC, that I was flying by the seat of my pants from Florida to just east of Houston. The good news is, there's plenty of opportunities in that stretch to get fuel and bio-breaks in the ride. The couple of breaks I *had* to make early on (sleepy monster, bio-break) made me focus on many of those things that you read about in Ride Reports [so, how did so-and-so remedy this problem?]. Once those were overcome, then it became a bit of a game (how do I need to ride to be able to rejoin my plan?). Having studied the route - both via Google Maps and by tools that Greg Rice and others have provided, it turned that "Oh, s***!" moment into a "Hey, I got this figured out!" moment.

It took about ten hours to get to that point, however. :)

"Patience, grasshopper!"
Sounds like the start of my 100CCC in March 2014
- Didn't realize that I was starting on the first day of daylight savings time - One hour of sleep lost
- Went to the wrong hotel in JAC - Another hour of sleep lost
- Road closures in JAX made getting out of town a little more complex
- Drank too much caffeine to get moving due to lost sleep and being out of practice for long riding over winter = frequent bio breaks
- Received a performance award from the Florida State Police who had an aircraft in the air since it was the start of Daytona Bike Week
- Got caught in road closures due to construction in San Antonio and made several wrong turns
- Lost my rear brakes in El Paso and had to stop at the Harley Dealer for parts

And on the return trip I ran into a nasty windstorm where I could not see 50 feet and had to spend the night in Stockton TX resulting in a final leg of 1470 miles ... and at that point I had not done a BBG so I was unsure if I could do it.

Other than that it was smooth sailing :)

Moral of the story - expect anything when crossing the entire country. And it was sure worth it at the end when I saw the sunrise back in JAX 4 days later

 

Kerry Walker

Premier Member
#48
Welcome to Premier.

I have done the 50CC quest a few times, usually in March around the JAX Pizza Party. I started in Santa Monica (SMO) because I lived only 15 miles from the start and it was not worth the 100 miles saving to ride to San Diego (SDO) but I have done a 100CCC starting and ending in SDO.

I advise;

Plan your route at about 80% of your expected range - know your fuel stops and have an alternative
Particularly in west Texas do not push your fuel. The combination of wind and high speed can have a surprising effect on range.
Pay attention to thunderstorms - particularly in west Texas and New Mexico.
Leaving or approaching SDO the mountain range can be cold, very cold - and the wind on corners can be dangerous. Watch also for sand in the road, particularly on corners.
I-8 is mostly wind-open but there can be enforcement. I run about 84 in AZ and CA.
Leaving the long slow-zone in Tucson, be patient. There might be a speed tax collector at the very end of the slow-zone, just before it goes back to 75mph.
New Mexico has "safety corridors" which is a code phrase for revenue enhancement zones.
El Paso has a long slow zone but usually not much of a traffic issue. I use WAZE to get through cities. If for any reason I-10 is clogged in El Paso take TX-375, Trans Mountian loop. This adds about 5 miles to your route.
Just east of ELP (near mp66) the speed limit jumps to 80mph and there is not a slow down until Kerrville. Over 450 miles, you got a rocket ship so watch the fuel.
Once you get to San Antonio, most riders I know take FM1604, Anderson Loop around the city. The fist/last couple of miles are not divided four-lane and there are a half dozen stop lights.
Approaching Houston (use WAZE) can be a crapshoot. The Sam Houston Tollway might save you time. I have a toll transponder but when I did not I blew off the tolls and did not get a ticket (I think the Wing's license plate is positioned such that the camera does not get a clear photo).
Houston to the LA state line there is a short 65mph zone and it is ENFORCED.
Once in Louisiana, the roads are going to be worse and more crowded so get used to it.
The loop (I think 210) in Lake Charles is usually no faster, I usually stay on I-10
Baton Rouge can be by-far the worst metro area as there is no loop and few alternatives. Advise WAZE but delays here can be brutal, over an hour.
Just west of Baton Rouge is a long slow zone over a swap (the whole state is pretty much a swap). Watch for enforcement.
Just east of Baton Rouge take I-12 which cuts off the drive into New Orleans, one of the great cities in the world but not for a 50CC.
You can expect a minor slow down in Mobile over a bay on an elevated section of I-10 and through a short tunnel.
In Florida, the freeway is lined with trees (just a beautiful and SUPER FLAT drive). Deer, deer, and more deer.
I-10 ends/begins at the 95 which (if west to east) you take about 10 miles to Butler Blve (FL 202) to A1A. Turn north and the GATES station is about 1/2 mile or so.
I have ridden it 13 times and love it.
Any advice for when to leave SDO? Thinking of leaving around 10PM in March to ride though Western Texas in daylight. Do you think that is wise or will I be just taking more risk in CA, AZ, NM?
 

kwthom

=o&o>
Premier Member
IBA Member
#49
Any advice for when to leave SDO? Thinking of leaving around 10PM in March to ride though Western Texas in daylight. Do you think that is wise or will I be just taking more risk in CA, AZ, NM?
Okay, so...let's understand your issues with W Texas during daylight hours - critters in the dark, I presume?

Roughly 30 miles east of SDO is some mountainous areas that could easily match the critters that one might experience in W Texas. Now, it's not hundreds of miles of terrain, but it's enough to get your attention. o_O

Adequate lighting certainly helps, but so does being able to be alert and functional for 17 or more hours into a ride.

If I'm doing my mental math right, leaving at 2200 Pacific time means you'll see daylight beginning in eastern AZ. From there until...you get to Junction, TX (or thereabouts) you'll be fine. Hit the bed, and wake up 6 or seven hours later...hey, it's still dark, and you still have the 100 miles to San Antonio, followed by the stuff to the east of there.

Sunrise schedule for a community east of me on your route in March: https://sunrise-sunset.org/us/benson-az/2021/3

Sunset schedule for a community in W Texas, same month: https://sunrise-sunset.org/us/junction-tx/2021/3

In general, you'll have several hours of no ambient light on a ride like this. The absolute best lighting means nothing if it's off, due to oncoming traffic issues. A fair percentage of critters are moving during those twilight periods - just before sunrise & just after sunset.

My one-and-only was done east-to-west. I did most of the Florida stretch in the dark, and ended my day several hours after dark in W Texas. It was still dark as I was approaching El Paso the next day, after six hours of sleep. Issues? Nope. I recognized very early there was absolutely no real need to go beyond posted speeds by any significant amount.

Hopefully, a bit of insight for you. Not certain any of us can state for certain the optimum time for YOU would be the optimum time for ME or anyone else.
 
#50
SDO to a hotel in Junction, Texas for my first half leg is precisely my plan at this time.

I'm planning an 8 hour stop in Junction, TX and then back on the bike in the wee hours.

Thanks for sharing your thoughts.
 

cacomly

Premier Member
IBR Finisher
#51
An 8 hour stop in Junction may be a bit optimistic because you may need that time later. You will likely hit traffic near Houston depending on the time you get there, plus there could be construction along the way or the road could be closed due to an accident.

On the return leg of my 100CCC I had to get off I-8 in Texas for 20 or so miles because it was closed due to an accident, there was construction in Louisiana where the road was down to 1 lane and was at a complete standstill so I had to get off again and take a US route that paralleled the Interstate about 5 miles to the south for another 20 or so miles. I'd suggest you shorten the stop by an hour or two. You can always stop later at a rest stop for a nap if needed.

Regarding departure time from SDO I agree with Ken. With a roughly 2700 mile ride in a little over 2 days you will be spending considerable time in the dark with the amount varying based on the time of year. Yes there are critters in West Texas that you need to be mindful of, but there are other stretches with critters as well. The only main difference is there is typically less traffic in West Texas. Also worth considering is the temps in the mountains Ken mentioned can drop considerably at night

Lastly, how rested will you be if leaving at 10pm? 2700 miles in 50 hours is not overly difficult but it's not a walk in the park either. Starting the ride at that time and then riding approximately 1300 miles in 14-18 hours can make for a long day. Of course if that is your normal sleep pattern then it may not be an issue.
 
#52
Thanks for the input. I, too, am not sure about leaving at that time.

Sounds like I need to rethink a more "normal" starting time. I was trying to avoid western Texas in the dark more than anything, but sounds like I'm focusing too much on that.

Thanks!
 
#54
Thanks for the input. I, too, am not sure about leaving at that time.

Sounds like I need to rethink a more "normal" starting time. I was trying to avoid western Texas in the dark more than anything, but sounds like I'm focusing too much on that.

Thanks!
Everyone's clock is different. I had a cousin who always left after work on a Friday. There is no way I would ever consider that. By the time he was in his late 50s that changed. I never asked what his chemical intake was. LOL
 

kwthom

=o&o>
Premier Member
IBA Member
#55
<...>I'm planning an 8 hour stop in Junction, TX and then back on the bike in the wee hours.
Let me give you a premonition... ;)

If you're NOT from around the SDO area, and you're doing this ride as your first "longer-than-a-day" LD ride, you're NOT gonna sleep worth a s#!t.

Your mind is gonna be zipping at close to Mach 1. When you do get to sleep, I truly hope it's a restful sleep - but don't be at all surprised if it's not.

Sounds like I need to rethink a more "normal" starting time. I was trying to avoid western Texas in the dark more than anything, but sounds like I'm focusing too much on that.
Based on what I just wrote...your subconscious mind will be a little more functional if you try and do a 'normal' departure.

Oh, and have those reservations in Junction in your pocket *before* you leave. One less thing to worry about. It's amazing that you'll not even worry about that. Plug the location into your GPS, ride right up to the place and know you have a room available.

Both Chris & Jerry have made excellent points that I didn't. See, sometimes it takes three or four brain-cells for a good, coherent thought. :D
 

cacomly

Premier Member
IBR Finisher
#56
Oh, and have those reservations in Junction in your pocket *before* you leave. One less thing to worry about. It's amazing that you'll not even worry about that. Plug the location into your GPS, ride right up to the place and know you have a room available.
I am one not to make reservations until the last minute. On my return leg I ran into heavy winds about an hour east of El Paso and visibility dropped to 20 feet. I fought it for a while and then stopped at Ft Stockton for the night which was 200 miles west of Junction. When I walked into the Marriott (or whatever it was) I was told "we're full and so is everyone else, the rodeo is in town" She then suggested I try some of the smaller motels and finally found one that had a room.

So book your hotels before you leave since you know where they will be. Many you can cancel up to 4pm that day, and if not then you can always pay for two rooms and only use one. I only did that twice in the last IBR ... :(
 

rneal55555

Premier Member
#57
I'm a follow your natural sleep patterns kinda guy, most of the time I try to just go to bed and sleep with no alarm and go when I wake up. I no from experience that coming of a full nights sleep fully rested I can pretty much go 24 hrs before I start to get dangerous. I will adjust that a little based on traffic at the start but only by a couple hours. Long story but I had a CC50 Kings Bay GA to SD and deviated from that plan and left at about midnight needed a nap a couple hours in and then another an hour or so later lost a little over two hours my original plan had me stopping in Van Horn but I only mad it to Ozona and needed sleep. I would have been ok in fact I thought was so ok I allowed 8 hrs in Ozona, the next morning I blew a tire in Ft Stockton. Tire was unpluggable it had a hole the size a pencil in it. Had to get a flatbed up to Odessa (closest dealer with a tire) and that was all it wrote. I lost 6 hours with the tire but I think of I had the hadn't given up the Nap time early on an kept my hotel time to 6 hrs I may have come sliding in to a finish with minutes to spare. As it was I had Documentation to turn it into two SS1000's and accomplished the CC50 on the way home staring at about 8 AM after a full nights sleep. BBG to Beaumont TX the a few hours sleep in Lafayette LA with the finish in Kings Bay.
 

cacomly

Premier Member
IBR Finisher
#58
I'm a follow your natural sleep patterns kinda guy, most of the time I try to just go to bed and sleep with no alarm and go when I wake up. I no from experience that coming of a full nights sleep fully rested I can pretty much go 24 hrs before I start to get dangerous. I will adjust that a little based on traffic at the start but only by a couple hours. Long story but I had a CC50 Kings Bay GA to SD and deviated from that plan and left at about midnight needed a nap a couple hours in and then another an hour or so later lost a little over two hours my original plan had me stopping in Van Horn but I only mad it to Ozona and needed sleep. I would have been ok in fact I thought was so ok I allowed 8 hrs in Ozona, the next morning I blew a tire in Ft Stockton. Tire was unpluggable it had a hole the size a pencil in it. Had to get a flatbed up to Odessa (closest dealer with a tire) and that was all it wrote. I lost 6 hours with the tire but I think of I had the hadn't given up the Nap time early on an kept my hotel time to 6 hrs I may have come sliding in to a finish with minutes to spare. As it was I had Documentation to turn it into two SS1000's and accomplished the CC50 on the way home staring at about 8 AM after a full nights sleep. BBG to Beaumont TX the a few hours sleep in Lafayette LA with the finish in Kings Bay.
That sounds like what some have experienced during the IBR :)