Riding in the HEAT take 2

Traxx

Premier Member
#1
Okay, so I changed bikes. From a Triumph Tiger Explorer with lots of air to cool down to a Triumph Trophy SE with lots of weather protection. I noticed that I am getting a lot less air movement on the Trophy SE than the Tiger. On the Tiger this applied and worked very well. http://www.ironbutt.com/ibmagazine/ironbutt_1002_62-66_hot.pdf
Now, I am not getting the air to my cuffs to inflate my jacket etc... For those of you that have a lot of weather protection, What do you do??? Is there a modification to the above article that I need to look into? Please any suggestions and such are welcome.
 

DelB

Premier Member
#2
I have a Gold Wing with hand wings. The hand wings can keep air off my hands or direct the air directly onto the grips.

Is there anyway to mount some type of air wing onto your fairing to direct wind onto your hands?
 

kwthom

Rider
Premier Member
IBA Member
#3
I don't have hand wings on mine; I simply lower my arm into the air flow to get that shot of breeze into my jacket.
 

RickRussell

Premier Member
#5
On my goldwing I create low pressure at my hands and open my windshield vent to blow on the center of my chest. With my wet t-shirt under my jacket and jacket liner in I did an SS1000 on a 120F + day on I 15. The airflow is reversed but effective. As long as I was moving I was fine.
 

XPLSV

Premier Member
#6
I have a Glacier Tek cooling vest with an extra set of gel packs I rotate through a cooler. Used it on a 3000 mile ride through southern Texas last August, part of which included a SS1000--made a big difference in the heat of the day.
 

XPLSV

Premier Member
#8
When temps hit the 93-95 area, there is going to be convective heating effect, aka a reverse wind chill. The warmer air hitting skin areas can increase the heating of your body relative to being parked on the side of the road. Evaporative cooling can help...keep hydrated, keep electrolytes balanced.
 

Stephen!

Premier Member
IBA Member
#9
When temps hit the 93-95 area, there is going to be convective heating effect, aka a reverse wind chill. The warmer air hitting skin areas can increase the heating of your body relative to being parked on the side of the road. Evaporative cooling can help...keep hydrated, keep electrolytes balanced.
...and that is the region (and beyond) that LDComfort excels... Unlike cotton or other fabrics, LDComfort keeps you cool without holding the water against your skin. The result is hours upon hours of cooled comfort without the rashes that develop in the nether regions using other fabrics.

Interestingly enough, it also works in extreme cold as well. While working outdoors in -20° temps (C or F :)) any sweat you create is immediately removed from your skin. Bonus is that you can wear less thickness overall and maintain mobility (something very important when working on outdoor displays during the winter in North Dakota). Keep out the wind and you will stay warm and dry in all kinds of nasty conditions.
 
#11
On my goldwing I create low pressure at my hands and open my windshield vent to blow on the center of my chest. With my wet t-shirt under my jacket and jacket liner in I did an SS1000 on a 120F + day on I 15. The airflow is reversed but effective. As long as I was moving I was fine.
i wear jerzees 29m while riding because it has dri power feature , it never let me sweat , have a look
https://www.ustradeent.com/adult-56-oz-dri-power-active-t-shirt-259.html
 
#12
Lot of good stuff here.
I rock LDC upper and lower under motor clothes.
Since I started this thread, I have moved over to an Electra Glide. Still some of the same issues with air flow.
On the new mount, I installed some vents that will direct air to the rider. This winter I may get some soft lowers to keep the wind off the legs.