What routing software do you use?

#1
I have a Garmin 660 for my '16 Spyder RT Limited. I currently have Base Camp downloaded and I am starting to learn it. I use Google Maps all the time on my phone but can't save routes in Android. I looked at Tyre, Calimoto, and US Topo maps. What do you all use? I am looking for Base Camp power with Google maps ease of use.
 

Amnon Romano

Premier Member
#2
Why can't you save routes in Android? When you're done with the routing share it with yourself via gmail, and before actually sending the mail just copy the link at the bottom and send/share/save it wherever you want. If you just want to save it to the home screen - at the upper right corner, inside the three dots, there's a "save to home screen" link.
 

Marc11

Premier Member
#6
You can save routes in Google Maps. Use the MyMaps function in the desktop browser version of Chrome/Google Maps. Then on your phone Google maps app you can call up the route.

If you want to send the route to your Garmin, export the route from Google maps as a kml file and use GPSBabble or GPS Visualizer to convert to GPX format and save to your GPS device.
 
#7
Just bookmarked GPS Visualizer. Looks like what I was looking for. Thank you. I will still work on using Base Camp seeing that seems to be the new norm. I do like the "Maps" program on a windows computer but that would be for planning only.
 
#8
I love using Google Maps. I simply save waypoints and make the waypoints places I'm going to get fuel. While the tank fills, I load up the next waypoint. That's assuming good luck with phone reception.

I also use TomTomGo as my offline GPS and use lots of saved routes and saved places. My saved places are available on both Android and iOS, but saved routes are only available on Android. Again, I save waypoints and just change them at fuel stops. It's actually pretty easy. This also allows you to plan routes and places on the computer - which I find to be very handy.

I also have 2 phones. 1 personal (iPhone 8) and 1 work (Sonim XP8) phone. Both are waterproof, so I can use either on the trip as backup.
 
#9
I use Garmin Basecamp with my Zumo 350LM
Not the most user friendly piece of software but once you get the hang of it it's pretty good.
I plan detailed routes for single or multiple day rides including stops, gas, POIs, layover time etc.
I can easily keep and modify them on my Surface Pro tablet while on the road and transfer them to my GPS.
I can link it to Google Earth and check POIs and gas stations to see if they are really there and what the area I plan to stop at looks like.

YMMV
 

kwthom

Rider
Premier Member
IBA Member
#10
Just bookmarked GPS Visualizer. Looks like what I was looking for. Thank you. I will still work on using Base Camp seeing that seems to be the new norm. I do like the "Maps" program on a windows computer but that would be for planning only.
Yup. My 48 State route was modified from routes others had graciously sent me as GPX files. The study of the GPX data was so much easier with Google Maps, so individual days of rides were created so I could study the stop locations.

Regenerating my own GPX files with BC so I could load them onto the GPS of my motorcycle (Goldwing...) was the most challenging part. Quite the effort needed, but I pulled it off. Thus, same route with both Google Maps (as a secondary source...) and my Garmin-built GPS on the bike (as primary source...) made it easy to deviate when needed.
 

FLHXHS

New Member
#11
I run a combination of Google Maps for the initial overview, and sometimes Harley-Davidson Ride Planner to redo the route and DL to the Harley-Davidson GPS. With the Maps to GPX might skip a step, the BaseCamp for OSX is pretty rudimentary. [IMO] I also run a Google Sheet to do my planning based on Google estimates for time, adding 10 mins for stop/fuel/bio and being a little generous for fuel range. I don't run an AUX tank, and would like to keep it that way.

Harry
 

Clive Rand

Premier Member
#12
I have used Google maps to plan my route and use my refueling points as markers, and then rode to those markers and that way I have always been on track with my distances, even with the latest downloads to my GPS has my bike riding in a paddock somewhere because the maps are not as up to date as one might hope, this in turn can make measuring distances a bit of a challenge, my odometer is also a bit of a close call, by accident my changing the size of my rear wheel has made my speedometer almost as accurate as my GPS (accidental I can assure you).