Any HD riders for these rides?

#21
I ride a Road King and find it incredibly comfortable for long rides. And in the great state of Washington, there are so many great long rides available! I also stop every 2-3 hours to stretch/fuel. I'm not interested in breaking any records, just completing the ride within time and getting home safely. We all have our own goals when doing a cert ride.

The best "trick' I use for the cert rides is to remind myself each time to put the kick stand down when I stop, especially at the end of the ride when you are exhausted and your brain isn't as sharp as it was when you left. I say it OUT LOUD, even though it is second nature. Likely sounds stupid to a lot of people, but on a heavy cruiser, a little bit tipped is often all the way tipped. That's not how to end a ride.

As a fellow Seattle area resident, be very mindful of when you are returning home. Get the WADOT app and make sure the roads aren't congested. Even at 10:00 pm, the Tacoma Curves can be in gridlock or Snoqualmie pass is backed up for miles. Also, I use the Windy App to negotiate the Columbia Gorge winds to see how bad they will be.
 

OX-34

Premier Member
IBR Finisher
#22
......The best "trick' I use for the cert rides is to remind myself each time to put the kick stand down when I stop, especially at the end of the ride when you are exhausted and your brain isn't as sharp as it was when you left. .........
I made the mistake of missing the kickstand and instead half deploying the centrestand in the middle of nowhere in the middle of the night in sub-zero temperatures. Suffice to say, letting go of the clutch lever on a huge engined bike does not cause it to stall. Rather it just took off with me riding one-handed like a bronco rider straight into the bush.

Although I have ridden IBA rides on a bunch of different bikes, I have never completed on on a big American cruiser. The closest bike to that would have been my Honda Valkyrie. I once rode three 1200+ mile days in a row on that bike and had done some minor mods:

- 2 x 3500Lm spot lights
- 20L jerry can on the back, which also worked as a back rest with the addition of an airhawk.
- Highway pegs for varying foot position
- a couple of GPSs
- heated grips
- temporary hard bags
- FJR1300 windscreen
- a flashlight fixed to the bars to point straight into the tank for jerry can fills in the middle of the night.


 

Carl Hagen

Premier Member
#24
My first SS1000 was on a 2004 Heritage Classic. Biggest complaint was range. The 5 gallon tank and the drop in mpg at higher speeds had me carrying extra gas. My second SS1000 was on 2020 FLHP (Road King Police). Better mileage and a 6 gallon tank changed everything. Still, a max range between 180 and 200 miles has me stopping about every 2.5 hours. The best thing I've done to both bikes is to upgrade to LED lights. I went with Custom Dynamics front to back. A little pricey but totally changed the night riding experience. Worth every penny. Finally, the inflatable Air Hawk seat cover on the Heritage was a pretty inexpensive upgrade that paid off big time.
 
#25
A lot of interesting stuff! It's good to see how many people just kludge together whatever they think will work for them out of what they have...usually. It supports my kludging tendencies and I've not lost me gear on the road yet!

Currently, on my 2015 H-D FLSTN I ride with my Biltwell EXFIL-80 stuffed full to provide a backrest, a windshield because I'm older than when I started doing this stuff and don't feel like taking the beatings I used to, Highway pegs to provide so positional variation, and I just installed a set of Hogworkz Halomaker headlight and auxiliary lights. I may make a change or two to the wiring so that the aux lights stay on when in high beam, though. A more controversial choice is the 16" ape hangers but they get me up off the bars and make the control far better. They're just about right at shoulder height but I've not used them, yet, for a longer ride and will be trying them out soon.

I get about 38mpg according to Fuelly and I've never had a real issue with quantity but sometimes I've had to squeeze a few stops close together to prevent any issue so in these IBA runs I'd probably pack a bit of extra so I can stretch it out without sweating it.
 
#26
As a fellow Seattle area resident, be very mindful of when you are returning home. Get the WADOT app and make sure the roads aren't congested. Even at 10:00 pm, the Tacoma Curves can be in gridlock or Snoqualmie pass is backed up for miles. Also, I use the Windy App to negotiate the Columbia Gorge winds to see how bad they will be.
Honestly, I've let Tacoma traffic discourage me from riding more often than I like.
 
#27
it makes me wonder if the large majority of big cruiser IBA ride finishers are "one-and-done" riders
Should be easy to calculate (along with the _variety_ of bikes that people have used, as individuals and in aggregate..) Ira, gimme that database! :D

One thing that probably also plays into the perception that there's a "right" bike is who is running their mouths talking a lot around here (and on the mailing list and on FB) - if you're a "one and done" (granting for the moment that's a thing) are you sticking around, trying to maximize your efficiency or improving your technique? It's easier also to follow a blazed trail of GS/A, K, FJRs than kludging from scratch.
 
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#28
Ah, the perpetually under construction Tacoma Curves. I've not lived here for that long, about 18 years, and it's been a bloody mess since I've been here.

My newest demotivator is the loss of the West Seattle Bridge...I live on the wrong side of it. Getting out of here between the hours of 0500 and 2100 is...difficult, more so that it was before.

Snoqualmie Pass can be bad but timing can help or take 410 or 12. I really like 410, actually.
 
#29
I ride Victory, my wife rides Indian, both basically stock full sized touring/ baggers. Both have proven rock solid reliable and comfortable on plenty of IBA rides. Harley works just as well, many, many IBA rides are done on them.
 

Traxx

Premier Member
#30
Started in the IBA cert rides with a Tiger 1200, then moved on to a Trophy SE and now on a 20 Electra Glide Standard. Each bike has its own series of certs.
The EGS mods are LED lighting with passing lamps, fork fangs, Freedom Shields 14” touring screen, Police Saddle, Hondo Garage wireless charging phone mount, E glide toys glovebox door and zero, nada non no engine mods.
I went with the EGS for dealer network, simplicity, reliability and rider comfort.