GSX1300R HAYABUSA

#1
I have been a long time fan of the Hayabsua since it's unveiling in 1999 but it has only been in the last 6 years I have had the opportunity to own 1 (or in my case now the 3rd). With it's unique look and impressive speed it rocketed to the top of the list for many sports bike riders and being the last motorcycle to hold the title of "Fastest Production Bike" it has stayed at the head of that list for many years longer than it should.
The bike it's self is not much different to what came off the production line in 1999 however there have been 3 changes from the restriction of the beasts top speed in 2001 to the addition of ABS as late as 2013.

Okay, history lesson over now onto why I use one for touring.

Apart from it's reputation for speed and curvaceous body the most amazing thing I found when I rode my first Hayabsua was how easy it was to ride. From wanting to stay upright at low speeds to turning and stopping. You can push past the bikes' (and riders') limits easily with all that power though. I remember being so "paranoid" of the expected power that I was blown away by the ease of riding it a block down the road. [Just for some reference I am currently in my late 40's and been riding road bikes since I was 15 from 125 single pot 2-strokes to large Harley ElectraGliders.] And so my love affair (or obsession) began and is still going strong.

For touring Suzuki has gotten several things wrong with this bike. The first to notice is the OEM seats. THEY ARE AS HARD AND AS FLAT STONE!! I have tried several additions and varieties to work out a solution to not only the hardness but the large smooth slab effect so that I have something my poor ass can sit on all day and I am not fighting to keep myself sitting securely. The following is the current end result:
1. Shape - I found that by scalloping out some of the foam at the front of the seat and putting a raised ridge along the back you create a seat that holds you better while still allowing sideways motions for cornering if needed. Now I can launch the bike and not feel like a cartoon characture with my legs flapping in the wind behind the bike.
2. Feel - Get rid of the factory foam!! I tried a cover of sheep skin with shag wool but of course that only works on dry days and takes forever to dry out if you do get it wet. I have also tried a Gel cover but while not as weather effected it was still only a temporary relief until the OEM foam hardness prevailed. I even tried a proper replacement Gel seat but just felt squishy, specially in the heat. Finally I am now trying memory foam and front the instant I wiggled my old ass onto the seat I have loved it. I have tested it out on a 5 day, 3000 klm ride around my State of Tasmania and later will be also doing about 6000 klm plus the SS1600K.

The other thing I needed to focus on was the ride positions as in reality it IS a sports bike after all. But believe it or not the only thing extra to do after scalloping out the seat is to raise the bars a bit (you have the option of using Helibars or extension blocks) and drop the pegs a bit. I have completed this by using the Helibars and some 360 degree adjustable, 28mm offset folding pegs. Other than some minor other things I feel my Hayabusa is now ready for the SS1600K.

Minor additions/changes include a Bagster tank cover to help with tank grip for my legs, complete with a 12-22 litre tank bag as well as a Ventura 55 litre soft rear bag and rack system. Some various 12v socket & USB connection points, a Throttlemeister cruise control system (yes it's unbelievable that even in 2013 Suzuki didn't have these electronic gizmo's as standard).

So that my Suzuki GSX1300R Hayabusa, a surprisingly great touring bike with some simple modifications.
 

BMWguy

IBA Member
#2
Batfink,
It IS an impressive motorcycle and very fast.
As far as riding position, there's a rider in the IBR - again - who rides a 250 Ninja.
Personally I don't see how he does it. If I tried to ride that motorcycle for more than 4 or 500 miles, I'd need some orthopedic help.

That said - you ride what YOU feel comfortable with and what YOU like and don't let anyone dictate to you what's appropriate. The seat on my 1967 Triumph Daytona was just a 3 foot 2x6 with a cover on it! Not really, but that's how it felt.
Check out the rally and you'll find all kinds of motorcycles that most folks would not label as LD machines, but the riders accomplish what they're trying to do so who's to say a Hayabsua is not an LD motorcycle!!
Soooo... get on that thing and get your SS1600K!! And, let the forum know how it goes!!

Mike
 

Scott Parish

Premier Member
#3
I agree with everything Mike said. The only limitation to what can be done on any bike is our imagination; and judging from some of then entrants to this year and previous IBR - some LD riders rival Stephen King in creativity.
 

thekaz

Premier Member
#4
like the others said any bike can be a long distance ride ;)
I put 50 000km worth of IBA rides on my ZX12R A2 including one of Canada's first inner city SS1600K's
Some even more sick frenchman rode in at least two IBRs with a ZX12R B1
BUT even the big beasts need to lay down once in awhile for a nap LOL
 
#7
I am getting ready for a Saddle Sore 1k on an 05 Hayabusa. I'll be riding from Albuquerque, NM to Dallas, TX via el paso and San Antonio. Should be fun. Do you all have any tips? I have a shaved down seat, helli bars, double bubble wind screen, 40mm lower pegs and a 50L tail bag. That's pretry much it
 

Scott Parish

Premier Member
#8
I am getting ready for a Saddle Sore 1k on an 05 Hayabusa. I'll be riding from Albuquerque, NM to Dallas, TX via el paso and San Antonio. Should be fun. Do you all have any tips? I have a shaved down seat, helli bars, double bubble wind screen, 40mm lower pegs and a 50L tail bag. That's pretry much it
Throttle lock of some kind - I recommend Throttlemeister if you do not have one yet.
 
#9
What do you think of the kind of throttle lock that wraps around the grip and is set by pushing it against the brake lever? I have a friend that can 3D print one for me.
 
#10
Throttle wraps do add an element of comfort; but for a long ride - I find it extremely beneficial to occasionally relax the throttle hand by flexing the fingers, stretching etc. without having to reach across and use my left hand to keep the throttle open.
 
#12
My apologies for misunderstanding - I thought you were asking about a palm push throttle adapter. I am not experienced with the device pictured. I suppose it is fine as long as it allows the throttle to be closed quickly in case of emergency. I recommend practicing with the device before setting off on your SS.
 
#13
I think I will have my friend print one so I can practice with it. And no need to be sorry for misunderstanding or interpreting it wrong. I could have done a better job explaining what I was thinking.
 
#14
What Scott said - a throttle lock, while not completely "necessary", will make the whole adventure much more enjoyable.
Being able to relax your throttle hand is priceless. It took me years to learn to stop the "death grip" on the twist grip! LOL!
Be sure you can shut down quickly with ease.

Plus - beginning an LD ride is really not the time to try out new additions to your motorcycle.. especially electronic ones. (Don't ask me how I know this!
Again - what Scott said...

Mike
 
#15
For sure. Thanks for your input. This will be my first long trip with many miles on one day. I have done a couple 2500 mile rides but they were all 200-300 mile days with adventure stuff thrown in. So they took quite some time. I'm excited for the experience of a long day on the bike. Depending on how this one goes I'll be doing one big ride a year.
 

RichmonS

Premier Member
#16
One more tip that I have is to have a music player of some kind and earplugs. I use the Earfoam units that are an earplug and headset in one. A long day at highway speeds and give people ringing in the ears.
 
#17
Yeah I would definitely develop a second personality out of boredom just so I had someone to talk to if I didn't have music on a ride. With my luck it would be a whiney pedantic second personality hahaha.
 

Scott Parish

Premier Member
#18
I know having music playing is important for many; but it is something I have never utilized. I love the sounds of the wind, my engine; and the long conversations I have with myself - never experienced boredom (even when crossing Texas :) ).
 

BMWguy

IBA Member
#20
I know having music playing is important for many; but it is something I have never utilized. I love the sounds of the wind, my engine; and the long conversations I have with myself - never experienced boredom (even when crossing Texas :) ).
We must be related... I just follow the "voices in my head"... LOL!

Plus, I like to listen to the motorcycle for any strange sounds that may start to occur.
Crossing Texas - I'm always on the lookout for those darned jack rabbits. A good friend hit one with his left foot doing about 70 at night... Riding with his toes down instead of the ball of his foot on the peg. For a while we both thought his foot was broken, but everything straightened out a while later.
Don't know how in the world the rear tire did not get it.